West Side Stories | Essay | Chicago Reader

West Side Stories 

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In 1930, when I first worked at Sears, one of my friends got married on a Saturday--Nancy. She lived in Oak Park. She was 18 years old.

She didn't have a big wedding or anything like that, and she came in on Monday to go to work. They called her into the main office and told her they were sorry, but they didn't have married women at Sears, so she would have to leave.

We had about 200 people in the collection department, all on one floor. And to think there were all those women and none of them were married. But when I think back, I know I never heard of their husbands. A lot of them were older. They just had all that Sears stock they held on to--profit sharing.

I don't know what happened to Nancy. She left, and I never saw her again.

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