Wesley Willis's brother is among the disabled artists working at Project Onward in Bridgeport | Space | Chicago Reader

Wesley Willis's brother is among the disabled artists working at Project Onward in Bridgeport 

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On the fourth floor of the Bridgeport Art Center, a 13,000-square-foot studio is dotted with art in various states of completion. From one workstation to the next, the work ranges wildly in style, medium, and subject matter. One drawing table is surrounded by paintings created by Sereno Wilson, aka Glitterman, who splashes his canvases with glue and sparkles. The adjacent desk is covered in the red and blue paints that Ruby Bradford uses in her offbeat takes on Superman. Another artist, Ricky Willis, uses cardboard to sculpt elements of the cityscape—water towers, CTA buses, automobiles, high-rise towers—that look not unlike ones that inhabited the drawings of his late brother, Wesley. 

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