The Family Dogs | Performing Arts Review | Chicago Reader

The Family Dogs 

Chris Bower examines the elusive nature of memory in this hour-long three-part work for the Halfway House Theatre Society. In the first section, two brothers argue endlessly over their contradictory memories of the family dog. The second consists of dull monologues from each brother, while the last is an unsettling video linked to the earlier dialogue and silently observed by the siblings' beer-guzzling father. Bower's script deftly juggles sad, creepy, and comic moments, but it needs a better translation to the stage. His decision to direct the work doesn't serve it well: the casting is weak--Scott Barsotti and F. Tyler Burnett don't give the material enough emotional resonance--and the staging is scattered. North theater, 7 PM.

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Agenda Teaser

Performing Arts
Henchpeople Jarvis Square Theater
July 09
Galleries & Museums
May 28

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