Street of No Return | Chicago Reader

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After the extensive recutting of his The Big Red One and the virtual shelving of his White Dog, American writer-director Sam Fuller reluctantly chose creative exile in Paris. In many ways the most elaborate and ambitious of his post-American features is this 1989 noir, an adaptation (by Fuller and producer Jacques Bral) of a David Goodis novel that was shot in Portugal. It stars Keith Carradine as a famous pop singer who winds up on skid row after he falls for a mysterious woman and gets his throat cut by her gangster boyfriend; much of the story is told in flashback after he's arrested during a race riot. Recognizably (and enjoyably) Fuller-esque in its caustic violence, its punchy yellow-press dialogue, and its campy sensationalism, the movie is hampered—to the point of becoming weirdly discombobulated—by its use of Lisbon locations to stand in for American ones; the experience is every bit as disconcerting as Anthony Perkins's American accent in Orson Welles's version of Kafka's The Trial. The singular vision of Fuller in his late 70s, tied as always to his passionate and radical view of the U.S., is filtered here through heaps of Eurotrash, and the results are distinctly unsettling. Fuller fans can't afford to pass this up. With Valentina Vargas, Bill Duke, Andrea Ferreol, Marc de Jonge, Rebecca Potok, and Bernard Fresson.

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