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My One and Only 

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My One and Only, Candlelight Dinner Playhouse.

This 1983 musical started out as a revival of George and Ira Gershwin's 1927 hit Funny Face--the first show in which Fred Astaire danced in top hat and tails. Several directors and librettists later (Peter Sellars and Mike Nichols were among the guys caught in the revolving door), it became a vehicle for Tommy Tune and Twiggy, which is why the lead characters are a twangy Texan and a British beauty. But though the touring production Tune brought here a decade ago was a dazzling showcase of jazz dance, it suffered from campy condescension toward the characters and material. This revival, directed by William Pullinsi with delightful choreography by Marc Robin, is more intimate and low-key, and it preserves Tune's imaginative reworkings of classic Gershwin songs ("'S Wonderful," "Strike Up the Band," "How Long Has This Been Going On?") while giving Peter Stone and Timothy S. Mayer's script more charm and warmth than the arch, slightly vulgar road show.

Andrew J. Lupp, looking remarkably like the young Astaire, conveys an engaging, relaxed masculinity as Billy Buck Chandler, the Lindbergh-like aviator who woos English Channel swimmer Edythe Herbert (strong-voiced Stacey Harris). Lupp's deceptively casual dancing is exhilarating in the title number, when he learns the essence of choreographic cool from dynamic Kenny Ingram as Harlem hipster Mr. Magix, and when he and Harris declare their love in a wading-pool duet that turns into a full-fledged water fight. This is one splashy show.

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