Experimental musician Brett Naucke loses an album to hard-drive theft, starts making a new one | Gossip Wolf | Chicago Reader

Experimental musician Brett Naucke loses an album to hard-drive theft, starts making a new one 

Plus: Threewalls hosts a multimedia performance inspired by Nina Simone and manic depression, and 80s thrashers Life Sentence reissue their debut.

Sign up for our newsletters Subscribe

click to enlarge The GoFundMe campaign to replace Brett Naucke’s stolen gear surpassed its goal in less than a day. - MARIA TZEKA
  • The GoFundMe campaign to replace Brett Naucke’s stolen gear surpassed its goal in less than a day.
  • Maria Tzeka

Early on Saturday, September 15, Chicago experimental musician Brett Naucke got home from the High Zero Festival to find he'd been robbed. The items stolen included an iMac and two hard drives that held an album he'd finished just days before. The product of nine months' work, it was slated for release on the label run by synth manufacturer Make Noise—which will now put out a different and still forthcoming Naucke album, for obvious reasons. "Because I've been playing one of the songs live, one of the tracks was completely salvageable," Naucke says. "It's actually on my laptop, which is not stolen." Unfortunately there's no practical way to re-create the rest of the record. Naucke's girlfriend Natasha Ryan launched a GoFundMe last week to pay for replacement equipment, and it passed its $1,600 goal in a few hours. He aims to complete a new album this year—the robbery, he says, "put me in supercharged mode."

On Wednesday, October 3, Humboldt Park arts space Threewalls hosts Artificial Light: 365 Days of Sun, a collaboration by artist Makeba Kedem-DuBose, dancer Ennis Martin III, and composer Renee Baker—it's inspired by the music of Nina Simone and by the stigmas attached to mania and depression. The collaboration features Kedem-DuBose's drawings, Martin's choreography, and a performance by Baker's Chicago Modern Orchestra Project. The evening closes with a talk led by Adler psych professor Nataka Moore.

When Life Sentence were active on the Chicago crossover thrash scene, Reagan was president, Metallica were decent, and kids still hung out at Punkin' Donuts. The band's short existence was so contentious that dueling lineups played around town before the members settled in court. Mosh-tastic jams such as "Punks for Profit" make their self-titled 1986 debut LP a classic—and on Friday, October 5, it's getting reissued on vinyl and CD via Bandcamp, augmented by demos and live cuts.  v

Got a tip? Tweet @Gossip_Wolf or e-mail gossipwolf@chicagoreader.com.

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

More by J.R. Nelson

Tabbed Event Search

Popular Stories