Film Search | Chicago Reader

You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Author

  • Rating

  • Show only

  • Days of Being Wild

    Wong Kar-wai's idiosyncratic style first became apparent in this gorgeously moody second feature (1991), whose romantic vision of 1960 Hong Kong as a network of unfulfilled longings would later echo through In the Mood for Love. more...
    • Tags:
  • As Tears Go By

    A low-level hood (Andy Lau) tries to maintain his equilibrium as he's pulled in one direction by his stable, provincial cousin (Maggie Cheung) and in another by his volatile pal (Jacky Cheung). more...
    • Tags:
  • El Dorado

    This late masterpiece (1966) by Howard Hawks is a virtual remake of Rio Bravo, just as Rio Bravo was a virtual remake of To Have and Have Not—only Hawks could make three great, and very different, films from one screenplay. more...
  • Man of Tai Chi (R)

    Keanu Reeves makes his directorial debut with this satisfying pastiche of Hong Kong action cinema, incorporating knock-out martial arts choreography (courtesy of the great Yuen Woo-ping), operatic brutality reminiscent of John Woo, balletic camera movements a la Johnnie To, and even some of Jackie Chan’s populist humor. more...
  • Far From Heaven

    Todd Haynes's best feature to date—a provocative companion piece to his underrated Safe (1995), which also starred Julianne Moore as a lost suburban housewife but is otherwise quite different. more...
    • Tags:
  • Thieves Like Us (R)

    Robert Altman's good-natured reluctance to be moved by the most common forms of sentiment yields, in this 1974 remake of Nicholas Ray's They Live by Night, a cool, at times unbearably objective look at the fragile relationship between two rather ordinary young people in Depression America (Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall), who happen to rob banks and get shot at a lot. more...
  • Stagecoach

    It's fashionable to put down John Ford's 1939 classic; certainly it's the weakest of Ford's major westerns, burdened with a schematic and pretentious Dudley Nichols script (the "cross section of society" on board the stagecoach), but its virtues remain intact. more...
  • Boudu Saved From Drowning

    Jean Renoir's effortless 1932 masterpiece is as informal, beguiling, and subversive as its eponymous hero, a tramp who is saved from suicide by a Parisian bookseller and ends up taking over his benefactor's home, wife, and mistress. more...