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  • The African Queen (PG)

    John Huston's odyssey theme reprised as comedy (1951), as Humphrey Bogart cavorts like a monkey and Katharine Hepburn exploits a latent strain of Eleanor Roosevelt. more...
  • Airplane! (PG)

    An old Paramount programmer, Hall Bartlett's Zero Hour (1957), remade in 1980 as a sketch comedy by writer-directors Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, and Jerry Zucker (Top Secret!, Ruthless People). more...
  • Barry Lyndon (PG)

    All of Stanley Kubrick's features look better now than when they were first released, but Barry Lyndon, which fared poorly at the box office in 1975, remains his most underrated. more...
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  • Breaking Away (PG)

    A modest 1979 film about four teenagers (Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern, and Jackie Earle Hailey) whose transition to responsible adulthood is impaired by the peculiar circumstances of their adolescence—they've grown up as downtrodden townies in the university community of Bloomington, Indiana (here given Ivy League status). more...
  • Charley Varrick (PG)

    Don Siegel wants to turn the tables on the paranoid fantasies that have animated some of his best films (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Madigan, Dirty Harry), but he never lets this get in the way of his impressive sense of humor and undisputed mastery at constructing an action film. more...
  • Countdown to Zero (PG)

    Nearly 50 years after the Cuban missile crisis, the danger of a nuclear attack on the U.S. is compounded by a false sense of safety and the widely accepted notion that eradicating nukes is a pipe dream. more...
  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (PG)

    Like most of his work, Stanley Kubrick's deadly black satirical comedy-thriller on cold war madness and its possible effects (1964) has aged well: the manic, cartoonish performances of George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, and Peter Sellers (in three separate roles, including the title part) look as brilliant as ever, and Kubrick's icy contempt for 20th-century humanity may find its purest expression in the figure of Strangelove himself, a savage extrapolation of a then-obscure Henry Kissinger conflated with Wernher von Braun and Dr. Mabuse to suggest a flawed, spastic machine with Nazi reflexes that ultimately turns on itself. more...
  • E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (PG)

    Steven Spielberg's 1982 film achieves the level of decent, middling Disney—Old Yeller, for example, rather than Snow White or Pinocchio—which is to say that the childhood myths being promulgated here are rather basic and unadorned, without the baroque touches and psychological penetration Disney could muster at his best. more...
  • Groundhog Day (PG)

    Bill Murray plays an obnoxious TV weatherman from Pittsburgh forced to relive the same wintry day in a small Pennsylvania town over and over again until he gets it right, in an unexpectedly graceful and well-organized comedy (1993) directed and cowritten by Harold Ramis. more...