Film Search | Chicago Reader

You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Author

  • Rating

  • Show only

  • The Kitchen
  • The Kitchen (R)

    Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish, and Elisabeth Moss star in this graphic novel adaptation as the wives of three New York gangsters who take over their husbands’ criminal syndicate after the men go to jail in the late 1970s. more...
  • Kingdom (R)

    Shinsuke Sato directed this Japanese action film based on Yasuhisa Hara's manga about a boy in ancient China who aspires to become a general. more...
  • The Kid Who Would Be King
  • The Kid Who Would Be King (PG)

    Although not in the league of bracing adult fare like John Boorman's Excalibur (1981), this child-centric update of Arthurian lore outclasses Guy Ritchie's King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017) by relying more on heart than bombastic CGI. more...
  • King of Thieves (R)

    In this edgy 2004 German-Slovakian feature, parents in a rural Ukrainian village sell their acrobatic son and daughter to a circus owner who promises them international fame and fortune; once they've been smuggled into Berlin, the girl is sold to a vicious pimp and the boy is apprenticed to a gang of teenage street thieves. more...
  • Kidnap
  • Kidnap (R)

    Halle Berry stars in this fast-moving thriller, as a divorced mother who goes into attack mode once her six-year-old son gets abducted. more...
  • Kiki (NR)

    Sara Jordeno directed this documentary about "a group of LGBTQ youths of color [who] unite to form a safe gathering space." more...
  • Kingsman: The Golden Circle
  • Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)

    Matthew Vaughn, director of Kingsman: The Secret Service, corrects his egregious bumping off of Colin Firth’s dapper London spy in that movie by resurrecting him for this sequel, which has as many stunts and gadgets but broader comedy. more...
  • Kong: Skull Island
  • Kong: Skull Island (PG-13)

    The giant ape returns, though this Jurassic Park knockoff takes place neither in the Depression era, which gave us the original King Kong (1933), nor in the present, when satellite photos would surely alert us to the existence of a 100-foot gorilla. more...
  • The Killing of a Sacred Deer
  • The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)

    After such menacing dadaist comedies as Dogtooth (2009) and The Lobster (2015), Greek writer-director Yorgos Lanthimos settles down with a conventional suspense story about a buttoned-down cardiovascular surgeon (Colin Farrell in a thick beard) being harassed by a fatherless teenager with an ax to grind (Barry Keoghan). more...
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (PG-13)

    After directing a number of British crime comedies, Guy Ritchie applied his rapid-fire wisecracks, gleeful violence, and flashy cutting and camera moves to the Sherlock Holmes franchise; that same method works well for this big-budget Arthurian legend, perhaps because the king (Charlie Hunnam) and his knights have been recast as streetwise brawlers targeting an evil usurper of the throne (Jude Law). more...
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword 3D
  • King Arthur: Legend of the Sword 3D (PG-13)

    After directing a number of British crime comedies, Guy Ritchie applied his rapid-fire wisecracks, gleeful violence, and flashy cutting and camera moves to the Sherlock Holmes franchise; that same method works well for this big-budget Arthurian legend, perhaps because the king (Charlie Hunnam) and his knights have been recast as streetwise brawlers targeting an evil usurper of the throne (Jude Law). more...
  • Keanu
  • Keanu (R)

    Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele, of the Comedy Central sketch program Key & Peele, make their big-screen debut with this weak gangster farce, which begins with a silly premise and follows it to its barely amusing conclusion. more...