• Compliance (R)

    Craig Zobel—whose crafty debut feature Great World of Sound (2007) played at the Chicago film festival but never opened here theatrically—takes on the unenviable task of dramatizing a story that defies credulity even though it's quite true. more...
  • The Grey (R)

    A great leap forward for the talented action director Joe Carnahan, this old-fashioned suspense tale builds on and yet subtly criticizes the slick violence of his Smokin' Aces (2006) and The A-Team (2010), culminating with a meditation on death that's uncommonly grave for an American movie. more...
  • The Road (R)

    John Hillcoat, who made a name for himself with the leathery Australian western The Proposition (2005), takes on the daunting task of adapting Cormac McCarthy's bleak novel about a man and his son trying to survive in a postapocalyptic U.S. Portrayed ad infinitum in sci-fi and fantasy, the postapocalypse may now seem about as scary as Post Raisin Bran, but Hillcoat gives it an unnerving solidity by focusing on the drab details of survival and linking them to the more hellish aspects of modern American life. more...
  • Shadow Dancer (R)

    This British thriller by James Marsh (Man on Wire) is a little too neatly scripted and tightly edited for my taste, but there are galvanizing performances from Andrea Riseborough, as a Belfast mother who's mixed up in the Provisional IRA, and Clive Owen, as an MI5 agent who turns her against her comrades. more...
  • Wake in Fright

    Ted Kotcheff (First Blood, The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz) directed this forgotten Australian masterpiece (1971) about an arrogant Sydney schoolteacher (Garry Bond) who's slowly driven mad after a prolonged stay in the Yabba, a desolate mining town in the middle of the Australian outback. more...