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  • Paradise Hills

    Why does it often seem that filmmakers who perfect every last detail of their visual presentation can’t bother to put a fraction of that effort into storytelling or character development? more...
  • Paranoia (PG-13)

    Eager young product designers lose their jobs at a New York high-tech firm after angering their ruthless boss (Gary Oldman), who then muscles their cash-strapped team leader (Liam Hemsworth) into serving as his corporate spy. more...
  • Parasite (NR)

    Bong Joon-ho’s Palme d’Or-winning satire is easily the South Korean writer-director’s best film since Memories of Murder (2003), exhibiting the earlier film’s formal control and mounting suspense while incorporating the trenchant insights into class conflict he displayed in Snowpiercer (2013). more...
  • Parker (R)

    All the principal figures involved in this generic action thriller seem like they're phoning it in: stars Jennifer Lopez and Jason Statham, screenwriter John J. McLaughlin (adapting a crime novel that Donald E. Westlake wrote under his pseudonym Richard Stark), and ever-bland director Taylor Hackford (An Officer and a Gentleman, The Devil's Advocate), who doesn't even bother to keep every shot in focus. more...
  • The Parts You Lose

    Christopher Cantwell directed this dramatic thriller about a young deaf boy in North Dakota who finds and befriends an injured man who may be more dangerous than he seems. more...
  • Passengers
  • Passengers (PG-13)

    This clunky sci-fi romance from director Morten Tyldum (The Imitation Game) is clearly a metaphor for how life’s uncertainties and the fear of dying alone can breed a selfish and possessive kind of love—the main characters not only actualize it but repeatedly articulate it, as if the audience were too dumb to figure it out. more...
  • Passengers 3D (PG-13)

    This clunky sci-fi romance from director Morten Tyldum (The Imitation Game) is clearly a metaphor for how life’s uncertainties and the fear of dying alone can breed a selfish and possessive kind of love—the main characters not only actualize it but repeatedly articulate it, as if the audience were too dumb to figure it out. more...
  • Patient Zero

    After a global pandemic turns most people into violent monsters, a man with the ability to speak the language of the infected goes looking for a cure. more...