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  • Underworld

    The first full-fledged gangster movie and still an effective mood piece, this 1927 milestone was directed by the master of delirious melodrama, Josef von Sternberg. more...
  • The Man Who Laughs

    Director Paul Leni, whose career was cut short by his death from blood poisoning in 1929, is best remembered for his creaky, campy haunted-house movie The Cat and the Canary, but this elegant Victor Hugo adaptation (1928) gives a much better sense of his considerable dramatic and pictorial talents. more...
  • Faust

    The great F.W. Murnau directed only one real blockbuster in Germany, just before coming to America to make his masterpiece, Sunrise; extravagant in every sense, Faust (1926) is laden with references to Dutch, German, and Italian painting and was rivaled only by Fritz Lang's Metropolis in driving the UFA studio toward bankruptcy. more...
  • The Ring

    Probably the most visually sophisticated of Alfred Hitchcock's silent pictures and certainly one of the best, this 1927 release sets up an edgy romantic triangle in a traveling carnival that involves two boxers (Carl Brisson and Ian Hunter) and a snake charmer (Lillian Hall-Davies). more...
  • Nosferatu

    The Munich Film Archive's invaluable restoration of F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu (1923), the first and probably the greatest of all vampire films. more...
  • The Artist (PG-13)

    French director Michel Hazanavicius takes a break from his OSS 117 spy spoofs to pay loving tribute to the silent cinema, re-creating its luminous black-and-white photography and consigning all the dialogue to intertitles. more...
  • Greed

    Erich von Stroheim's 1924 silent classic is more famous for its original eight-hour version than for this cut that MGM carved out of it (though apparently there were several prerelease versions, which Stroheim screened privately for separate groups). more...
  • Happiness

    The most famous and probably the best film by the neglected Russian pioneer Alexander Medvedkin ("the last Bolshevik" in Chris Marker's video of that title). more...