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  • The Sad Cafe (NR)

    This fourth feature from Bennie Woodell—about a man's choice between love and duty—is an homage to Hong Kong cinema. more...
  • Safe Haven (PG-13)

    As often as Lasse Hallström has directed melodrama (Dear John, Chocolat), he has yet to master the style; his films are excruciatingly self-serious in a genre that rewards good-natured uncouthness. more...
  • Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (PG-13)

    Lasse Hallstrom, director of such middlebrow touchstones as Chocolat (2000) and The Cider House Rules (1999), brings his art-house honey to this limp adaptation of a comic novel by Paul Torday. more...
  • Samson & Delilah (NR)

    Samson (Rowan McNamara) and Delilah (Marissa Gibson) are young aborigines stranded on a godforsaken reserve in the dusty Australian interior. more...
  • Savage State
  • Savage State

    In the middle of the Civil War, a Missouri-based family of affluent French immigrants decides to return to France; to do so, they hire a mercenary to aid them in crossing the war-torn country to New York, from where they’ll sail. more...
  • A Scene at the Sea

    A deaf garbageman finds a broken surfboard on his route, repairs it, and, with the support of his girlfriend, practices until he can ride a wave. more...
  • Sense of Humor
  • Sense of Humor

    Marilyne Canto directed and stars in this one-note romantic drama (2013), as a dour, widowed working mom who sabotages her own prospects for happiness. more...
  • Senso

    Aptly titled—a lush, melodramatic portrait of seduction and betrayal, decadence and deceit in the midst of Italy's resistance to Austrian occupation in the mid-19th century, revealing Luchino Visconti at his most baroque and the Italian cinema at its most spectacular (1954). more...
  • Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors

    Adapted from a novel by Ukrainian writer M. Kotsyubinsky, Sergei Paradjanov's extraordinary merging of myth, history, poetry, ethnography, dance, and ritual (1964) remains one of the supreme works of the Soviet sound cinema, and even subsequent Paradjanov features have failed to dim its intoxicating splendors. more...
  • Shall We Dance? (PG-13)

    Its paper-thin characters turned into caricatures by egregious hamming, this 1996 Japanese comedy drama about shy ballroom dancers is sentimental goo and downright interminable. more...
  • Shall We Dance

    Longer and more pretentious than most of the Astaire-Rogers musicals (1937), but still a sufficiently sophisticated good time. more...