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  • The Raven (R)

    Edgar Allan Poe invented the detective story, so turning him into the heroic sleuth of a mystery thriller makes perfect sense, and the much-debated circumstances of his death in October 1849 provide an ideal jumping-off point for this macabre entertainment. more...
  • Rebecca
  • Rebecca (PG-13)

    Apparently someone, somewhere, thought it wise to again adapt Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, as if the masterful 1940 film version, directed by no less than Alfred Hitchcock (with extensive oversight from producer David O. Selznick), wouldn’t hang over it like Rebecca herself does over the second, purportedly lesser Mrs. de Winter. more...
  • The Red Machine (NR)

    Set in Washington, D.C., in 1935, this low-budget period drama concerns an incorrigible safecracker who, after getting arrested, is offered a deal to work with a navy spy to decipher a system of codes that the Japanese are using to relay messages to their homeland. more...
  • Red Riding: 1974 (NR)

    Adapted from a series of novels by David Peace, the "Red Riding" trilogy (2009) incorporates true-crime stories from the north of England into a sweeping neo-noir saga in which the cops are as predatory as the criminals. more...
  • Red Riding: 1983 (NR)

    The third and last installment of the "Red Riding" trilogy (2009) works overtime to tie up all the loose ends from the previous two movies, which prevents it from developing any story momentum or thematic integrity of its own. more...
  • Rembrandt's J'Accuse

    In much of this 2008 video, director Peter Greenaway appears in a little box near the center of the image to lecture viewers (perhaps hector would be a better word) on his theory that The Night Watch, Rembrandt’s most celebrated painting, is actually an indictment of a murder. more...
  • Remember Last Night?

    A screwball comedy and murder mystery in the Thin Man mode, directed by James Whale, who's never been properly appreciated for the wit and the engaging minor characters found in some of his nonhorror features. more...
  • Rojo
  • Rojo

    Many works of art foreground the victims of corruption; fewer investigate the hearts and minds of those who turn their backs. more...
  • Run
  • Run

    Mothers and matriarchs have been a symbol of horror for much of the genre’s history: think Brian De Palma’s Carrie, John Waters’s Serial Mom, or Ari Aster’s Hereditary, among others. more...