Film Search | Chicago Reader

You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Try and Get Me!

    Conceivably the most anti-American Hollywood picture ever made—I certainly can't think of any competitors—Cy Endfield's brilliant and shocking 1951 thriller (also known as The Sound of Fury) was adapted by Jo Pagano from his novel The Condemned, which was inspired by a lynching that occurred in California during the 30s. more...
  • Touch of Evil

    After seeing the work print of his last Hollywood feature, Orson Welles wrote a lengthy memo requesting several changes in editing and sound—work that was carried out in 1998 by producer Rick Schmidlin and editor Walter Murch with me as consultant. more...
  • Odds Against Tomorrow

    This ambitious but mainly unsuccessful 1959 black-and-white heist thriller—a loose adaptation of a John P. McGivern novel, credited to John O. Killens and Nelson Gidding but written by the blacklisted Abraham Polonsky—founders on allegorical positioning, although the location photography of Manhattan and upstate New York has its moments. more...
  • The Window (NR)

    Adapted by Mel Dinelli from a Cornell Woolrich story, this taut 1949 thriller is one of the most underrated B pictures of the 40s, perhaps because neither its director (Ted Tetzlaff) nor its stars (Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy, Ruth Roman, and Paul Stewart) are strong calling cards today. more...
  • The Big Lebowski (R)

    Probably the Coen brothers' most enjoyable movie—glittering with imagination, cleverness, and filmmaking skill—though, as in their other films, the warm feelings they generate around a couple of salt-of-the-earth types don't apply to anyone else in the cast: you might as well be scraping them off your shoe. more...
  • The Big Clock

    John Farrow directed this tasteful film noir (1948), which is something of a contradiction in terms; it's reminiscent of Fritz Lang without Lang's hysteria. more...
  • Un Flic
  • Un Flic (PG)

    Despite a stellar cast (Alain Delon, Catherine Deneuve, Richard Crenna), this 1972 film, the last by the great noir stylist Jean-Pierre Melville, is a murky disappointment. more...
  • Classe Tous Risques

    Released in 1960, as the French New Wave was getting started, this terse and fatalistic (if conventional) noir about a gangster on the run from Milan to Nice to Paris was hastily swept aside, though Jean-Pierre Melville defended it passionately and wound up appropriating its star (Lino Ventura), actor Jean-Paul Belmondo (costarring here immediately after Breathless), source novelist (Jose Giovanni), and some of its male-bonding manner in various projects. more...
  • Rififi

    It's one of the enduring mysteries of the Hollywood blacklist that directors such as Joseph Losey and Cy Endfield had to hide behind fronts or pseudonyms, whereas Jules Dassin was able to direct this atmospheric 1955 French thriller under his own name and still get it shown in the U.S., where it was something of an art-house hit. more...
  • Gun Crazy
  • Gun Crazy

    One of the most distinguished works of art to emerge from the B movie swamp, Joseph H. Lewis's 1949 film is a proto-Bonnie and Clyde tale of an outlaw couple on the run. more...