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  • The Big Clock

    John Farrow directed this tasteful film noir (1948), which is something of a contradiction in terms; it's reminiscent of Fritz Lang without Lang's hysteria. more...
  • The Big Lebowski (R)

    Probably the Coen brothers' most enjoyable movie—glittering with imagination, cleverness, and filmmaking skill—though, as in their other films, the warm feelings they generate around a couple of salt-of-the-earth types don't apply to anyone else in the cast: you might as well be scraping them off your shoe. more...
  • Caught

    European exile Max Ophuls looks at American materialism in this 1949 story of a woman's involvement with a Howard Hughes-ish millionaire, and finds it just as stifling as the old-world variety. more...
  • The Chase

    Not the Arthur Penn excess from the 60s, but a rarely screened 1946 adaptation of a Cornell Woolrich novel about an ex-GI trying to spirit the wife of a mobster away from dark, malarial Miami. more...
  • Classe Tous Risques

    Released in 1960, as the French New Wave was getting started, this terse and fatalistic (if conventional) noir about a gangster on the run from Milan to Nice to Paris was hastily swept aside, though Jean-Pierre Melville defended it passionately and wound up appropriating its star (Lino Ventura), actor Jean-Paul Belmondo (costarring here immediately after Breathless), source novelist (Jose Giovanni), and some of its male-bonding manner in various projects. more...
  • Criss Cross

    Robert Siodmak was one of the most influential stylists of the 40s, helping to create, in films such as Phantom Lady and The Killers, the characteristic look of American film noir. more...
  • Un Flic
  • Un Flic (PG)

    Despite a stellar cast (Alain Delon, Catherine Deneuve, Richard Crenna), this 1972 film, the last by the great noir stylist Jean-Pierre Melville, is a murky disappointment. more...
  • Gun Crazy
  • Gun Crazy

    One of the most distinguished works of art to emerge from the B movie swamp, Joseph H. Lewis's 1949 film is a proto-Bonnie and Clyde tale of an outlaw couple on the run. more...
  • Hangover Square

    John Brahm, a baroque stylist of the 40s best known for The Locket and his remake of Hitchcock's The Lodger, directed this striking Victorian gothic (1944) about a high-strung and temperamental composer (Laird Cregar) who goes nuts when his mistress (Linda Darnell) betrays him. more...