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  • Beatriz at Dinner
  • Beatriz at Dinner (R)

    Salma Hayek brings depth and feeling to the title character, an occupational therapist in Los Angeles whose car breaks down at the home of a superrich client (Connie Britton). more...
  • The Lobster
  • The Lobster (R)

    The Lobster, the first English-language feature from Greek writer-director Yorgos Lanthimos, takes place in a dystopian world where single people are hunted with tranquilizer darts and, when captured, must secure a suitable mate within 45 days or be transformed into an animal. more...
  • Wiener-Dog (R)

    Todd Solondz revives Dawn Wiener, the geeky child who won America's heart in his Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995), for this nihilistic collection of stories linked by changing ownership of a dachshund. more...
  • The D Train
  • The D Train (R)

    One of the production companies behind The D Train is England's Ealing Studios, which produced such immortal comedies as Whisky Galore! more...
  • Irrational Man
  • Irrational Man (R)

    A depressed philosophy professor (Joaquin Phoenix) at a New England college overhears a conversation about a corrupt judge and takes it upon himself to plan the perfect murder, to the growing suspicion of an undergraduate who has a giant crush on him (Emma Stone). more...
  • Cake (R)

    Glamorous movie actresses often win respect through highly unflattering roles: Jessica Lange ranting and raving as the mentally ill starlet in Frances (1982), Nicole Kidman wearing dowdy outfits and a prosthetic nose as Virginia Woolf in The Hours (2002), Charlize Theron grunging out as trailer-trash serial killer Aileen Wuornos in Monster (2003). more...
  • Horns
  • Horns (R)

    French schlockmeister Alexandre Aja (High Tension, Piranha 3D) ventures into Grimm brothers territory and acquits himself surprisingly well; however crass and mean-spirited this 2013 fantasy gets, the handling of fairytale conventions is sincere, which gives the film an emotional weight. more...
  • The Guest
  • The Guest (R)

    This freewheeling, low-budget horror comedy suggests a millennial update of Brian De Palma's 1970s work, as writer Simon Barrett and director Adam Wingard (You're Next) turn a trashy genre exercise into a vehicle for social satire, ambitious camera work, and lots of movie parodies and homages. more...
  • Force Majeure (R)

    If Michael Haneke were recruited to direct an American sitcom pilot, the results might look something like this Swedish feature, about an upper-middle-class family vacationing unhappily in the French Alps. more...
  • The Zero Theorem
  • The Zero Theorem (R)

    This cartoonish sci-fi satire might be described as Terry Gilliam's Mr. Arkadin—a visually inspired but frequently confounding (and clearly underfinanced) reworking of longtime personal themes. more...
  • Calvary
  • Calvary (R)

    Everyone has a breaking point, and James Lavelle, the Irish Catholic priest at the center of John Michael McDonagh's Calvary, reaches his one afternoon as he's strolling down a secluded path toward the seaside in his little village of Rush, County Sligo. more...
  • Life After Beth
  • Life After Beth (R)

    After the title character (Aubrey Plaza) dies of a snakebite, her grief-stricken boyfriend (Dane DeHaan) and parents (Molly Shannon, John C. Reilly) are stunned to see her show up again, unharmed and unfazed, with no memory of what's happened. more...