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  • Catch-22 (R)

    Mike Nichols's 1970 film might have been the original "deal" movie: it's got all the right elements—a hot director, a cult novel, an impeccably hip cast—yet nothing comes together. more...
  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    Like most of his work, Stanley Kubrick's deadly black satirical comedy-thriller on cold war madness and its possible effects (1964) has aged well: the manic, cartoonish performances of George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, and Peter Sellers (in three separate roles, including the title part) look as brilliant as ever, and Kubrick's icy contempt for 20th-century humanity may find its purest expression in the figure of Strangelove himself, a savage extrapolation of a then-obscure Henry Kissinger conflated with Wernher von Braun and Dr. Mabuse to suggest a flawed, spastic machine with Nazi reflexes that ultimately turns on itself. more...
  • Macunaima

    This 1969 Brazilian film by Joachim Pedro de Andrade is at once poetic and grotesque, using cannibalism as a metaphor for the exploitation of Brazilians by Brazilians and international capitalism under the military dictatorship that started in 1964. more...
  • The Man Next Door

    This Argentinian feature is compelling for the way it responds to the ideas of the Swiss architect Le Corbusier: on the one hand, directors Mariano Cohn and Gastón Duprat create a rich mise-en-scene around a multi-tiered Corbusier home in Buenos Aires, but on the other, the story is a biting satire of his admirers. more...
  • Network (R)

    Good campy fun from the combined talents of Paddy Chayefsky and Sidney Lumet; Chayefsky was apparently serious about much of this shrill, self-important 1976 satire about television, interlaced with bile about radicals and pushy career women, and so were some critics at the time. more...