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  • Black Mass
  • Black Mass (R)

    Based on a nonfiction book by Dick Lehr and Gerard O'Neill, this crime saga details the corrupt partnership between South Boston crime lord James "Whitey" Bulger (a balding, unrecognizable Johnny Depp) and FBI agent John Connolly (Joel Edgerton), an old pal who cultivated Bulger as an informant but may have done more to help his criminal empire than Bulger did to help the bureau. more...
  • Sicario
  • Sicario (R)

    American action movies about the drug cartels (David Ayer's Sabotage, Oliver Stone's Savages) have a high bar to clear: unless they bring some greater understanding of the crisis, their portrayal of the cartels' barbarism seems like crass exploitation. more...
  • Foxcatcher
  • Foxcatcher (R)

    Bennett Miller follows his acclaimed Moneyball (2011) with the story of Olympic philanthropist John Eleuthère du Pont, and as in the earlier movie, competitive sports becomes the vehicle for a brutal economics lesson. more...
  • Dom Hemingway
  • Dom Hemingway (R)

    "Jude Law is Dom Hemingway," reads the poster for this British comedy—just in case you needed some persuading that the poised, delicately handsome actor could pull off his role as a brutal, randy, flamboyant, explosively angry ex-con. more...
  • The Drop
  • The Drop (R)

    James Gandolfini, in his last movie role, plays the mobbed-up owner of a Brooklyn workingman's bar, but the more impressive performance here comes from Tom Hardy as his younger cousin, a guileless soul who tends bar and worries that they've gotten themselves in too deep. more...
  • American Hustle (R)

    David O. Russell's fictionalized drama about Abscam, the FBI sting operation that nailed more than a half dozen U.S. legislators on bribery and conspiracy charges, made me nostalgic for the 70s—not for all the bad hair, splayed collars, gold chains, and plunging necklines, but for an era when grown-up movies like this one came out almost every week. more...
  • Seven (R)

    Who would have guessed that a grisly and upsetting serial-killer police procedural (1995) costarring Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman as detectives, written by a Tower Records cashier (Andrew Kevin Walker), and directed by David Fincher (Alien) would bear a startling resemblance to a serious work of art? more...
  • Killing Them Softly (R)

    Producer Brad Pitt and writer-director Andrew Dominik team up again after their critically acclaimed The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007), switching genres from western to crime—their source material is George V. Higgins's 1974 novel Cogan's Trade—but focusing again on the talk of hardened men. more...
  • End of Watch (R)

    I'm not sure who appointed David Ayer poet laureate for the LAPD, but at least he takes the job seriously; along with the usual mean-streets bluster and brutality, his cop-thriller screenplays (Training Day, Dark Blue) conscientiously record the hardening effects of a thankless and frequently pointless job. more...
  • Outrage (R)

    Like some of Jean-Pierre Melville’s late works (Le Samourai, Le Cercle Rouge), Takeshi Kitano’s 2010 feature pares down the crime film to a repetition of favorite motifs: the story is something of a reductio ad absurdum of the yakuza flick, with one honor killing leading to another and so on, until nearly all the main characters are dead. more...
  • The Town (R)

    Ben Affleck's feature directing debut, Gone Baby Gone (2007), achieved a tragic depth unusual for a crime film because the child at its center, though rescued from kidnappers, was ultimately deposited back into a hopeless cycle of poverty and domestic abuse. more...