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  • The Killer Inside Me (R)

    Shape-shifting British director Michael Winterbottom—whose filmography ranges from rock comedy (24 Hour Party People) to harsh social drama (In This World) to literary postmodernism (Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story) to sexual rhapsody (9 Songs)—takes on the uniquely searching and sinister pulp fiction of Jim Thompson. more...
  • Killing Them Softly (R)

    Producer Brad Pitt and writer-director Andrew Dominik team up again after their critically acclaimed The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007), switching genres from western to crime—their source material is George V. Higgins's 1974 novel Cogan's Trade—but focusing again on the talk of hardened men. more...
  • L.A. Confidential (R)

    Crooked reporter Danny DeVito and vice cop Kevin Spacey set up sensational stories for a Los Angeles scandal sheet in the 50s and become enmeshed in the investigation of a multiple murder. more...
  • Mean Streets (R)

    Martin Scorsese's intrusive insistence on his abstract, metaphysical theme—the possibility of modern sainthood—marks this 1973 film, his first to attract critical notice, as still somewhat immature, yet the acting and editing have such an original, tumultuous force that the picture is completely gripping. more...
  • Mother (R)

    With The Host, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho unpacked the cultural and geopolitical baggage of the atomic monster movie; this follow-up (2009) takes on the fractured Freudianism of Hitchcock's Psycho. more...
  • Outrage (R)

    Like some of Jean-Pierre Melville’s late works (Le Samourai, Le Cercle Rouge), Takeshi Kitano’s 2010 feature pares down the crime film to a repetition of favorite motifs: the story is something of a reductio ad absurdum of the yakuza flick, with one honor killing leading to another and so on, until nearly all the main characters are dead. more...
  • A Prophet (R)

    Some have compared this French crime drama to The Godfather, and though that may be a common critical touchstone, writer-director Jacques Audiard (Read My Lips, The Beat That My Heart Skipped) manages to replicate its most elusive element—not the dark comedy or the operatic bloodletting but the incremental corruption of a decent man into a willful, coldhearted killer. more...