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  • Dean (PG-13)

    Comedian Demetri Martin is partially famous for using drawings in his stand-up routines; in his debut feature as writer-director he also stars as a grieving Brooklyn cartoonist, but here his doodles don't carry the same punch. more...
  • A Man Called Ove
  • A Man Called Ove (PG-13)

    Two of the most hackneyed scenes ever are the comically interrupted suicide attempt and the lonely soliloquy addressed to a dead spouse's headstone; the title character (Rolf Lassgård) gets them both, multiple times, in this slow and obvious Swedish drama. more...
  • The Lady in the Van
  • The Lady in the Van (PG-13)

    The homeless, mentally ill woman who spent 15 years camping in the driveway of playwright Alan Bennett has given him material for a short story, a play (staged in the West End and adapted by BBC Radio), and now a film, starring Maggie Smith in a role that seems tailor-made for her drollery. more...
  • Rules Don't Apply
  • Rules Don't Apply (PG-13)

    Warren Beatty's engrossing drama about Howard Hughes in Hollywood shares less in common with Martin Scorsese's diligent Hughes biopic The Aviator than with the Coen brothers' tinseltown fantasy Hail, Caesar!, in which history is chewed, stretched, and rechewed like bubble gum. more...
  • Café Society
  • Café Society (PG-13)

    For the first time since Radio Days (1987), Woody Allen provides the voice-over narration for one of his own stories, his thick-tongued delivery reinforcing one's sense of this Depression-era romance as an old man's nostalgia trip. more...
  • Florence Foster Jenkins
  • Florence Foster Jenkins (PG-13)

    The story of Florence Foster Jenkins, a New York socialite who became known as the world's worst soprano, has been told many times before—and beautifully, in the French drama Marguerite (2015)—but this is the version that will stick, because it stars Meryl Streep. more...
  • La La Land: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13)

    When Damien Chazelle tried to resurrect the movie musical with his debut feature, Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench (2009), he was constrained by the modest means of a Canadian indie; now, having made a name for himself with the Oscar-nominated jazz drama Whiplash (2014), he returns to the challenge with $30 million behind him, and the result is dazzling. more...
  • I'll See You in My Dreams
  • I'll See You in My Dreams (PG-13)

    A nuanced lead performance by Blythe Danner anchors this better-than-average entry in the growing subgenre of light dramas about Baby Boomers learning to enjoy retirement; unlike many of the others, it doesn't try to make the protagonist likable at every turn. more...
  • Paper Towns (PG-13)

    This ambitious teenpic begins in the vein of Ferris Bueller's Day Off, as a rebellious high school senior (Cara Delevingne) recruits the shy boy next door (Nat Wolff) to join her in a night of mischief around suburban Orlando. more...
  • Ricki and the Flash
  • Ricki and the Flash (PG-13)

    Oscar-winner Jonathan Demme (The Silence of the Lambs) directs Oscar-winner Meryl Streep (The Iron Lady, Sophie's Choice, Kramer vs. Kramer) in a script by Oscar-winner Diablo Cody (Juno), and the result is cold porridge. more...
  • The Intern
  • The Intern (PG-13)

    In this crowd-pleasing rom-com by Nancy Meyers (Something's Gotta Give), a bored, widowed retiree (Robert De Niro) hires on as an intern for an online clothing boutique launched by a harried millennial overachiever (Anne Hathaway). more...
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (PG-13)

    Jonathan Levine's 50/50 (2011) broke new ground by turning a preeminent source of movie drama—young people battling cancer—into the stuff of wiseacre comedy. more...