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  • Gold
  • Gold (R)

    No one can accuse Stephen Gaghan of blowing off his homework: as a screenwriter (Traffic) and writer-director (Syriana), he's shown an eagerness to explore complex social or political situations even as he lays out a weave of individual stories. more...
  • The Good Guy (R)

    Any movie that name-checks Ford Maddox Ford's novel The Good Soldier is OK by me, and clearly writer-director Julio DePietro has made a careful study of Ford's crafty, illusory narrative. more...
  • The Graduate

    One of Mike Nichols's better films, though one suspects that the gargantuan commercial success it had back in 1967 had at least as much to do with the zeitgeist as with Nichols's talent in popularizing certain French New Wave tropes and adapting the satiric manner of his old stand-up routines with Elaine May. Dustin Hoffman, in the performance that made his career, plays the disaffected title youth, coerced into an affair with a middle-aged woman (Anne Bancroft) while remaining smitten with her daughter (Katharine Ross). more...
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel
  • The Grand Budapest Hotel (R)

    Even if you've never seen a Wes Anderson movie, you've probably seen the American Express commercial he made in 2004, which was ubiquitous on American TV: between takes on a movie set the hip young director marches around giving instructions to his actors, noting the makeup job on a geisha character, conferring with his prop man on a suitable weapon for a scene ("Can you do a .357 with a bayonet?"), and putting a $15,000 helicopter rental on his AmEx before he seats himself on a camera crane and floats heavenward. more...
  • Grandma
  • Grandma (R)

    The pistol-packin' granny has been a comedy archetype for years, but it turns out to be the role of a lifetime for Lily Tomlin, whose tour de force performance lights up this well-written escapade by Paul Weitz (About a Boy). more...
  • The Great Beauty
  • The Great Beauty (NR)

    Celebrating Rome in all its decay, this florid comedy by Paolo Sorrentino (Il Divo, This Must Be the Place) opens with a hyperbolically gaudy party honoring a celebrity journalist (Toni Servillo) on his 65th birthday. more...
  • Greenberg (R)

    A young personal assistant (Greta Gerwig of Hannah Takes the Stairs) house-sitting for her vacationing boss finds herself sharing the place with his neurotic brother (Ben Stiller), who's on the mend—or not—from a nervous breakdown. more...
  • Happiness

    I'll concede that Todd Solondz's absorbing 134-minute epic of sexual disgruntlement in the New Jersey suburbs (1998) is worth seeing, and not only for shock value. more...
  • HappyThankYouMorePlease (R)

    A self-help book disguised as a movie, this romantic comedy combines stories of angst-ridden New York singles with the kind of uplifting homilies found in bestsellers like The Happiness Project and Simple Abundance. more...
  • Haute Cuisine (PG-13)

    Inspired by the true story of Daniele Mazet-Delpeuch, the first female chef employed in France's Elysee Palace, this comedy of manners is a foodie's dream. more...
  • The Hedgehog (NR)

    Lacking any depth of its own, this upper-middlebrow French drama (2009) resorts to the old trick of referencing acknowledged masters. more...
  • Hello I Must Be Going (R)

    Distraught over her recent divorce, a layabout in her mid-30s (Melanie Lynskey) seeks refuge in the suburban Connecticut home of her wealthy parents (Blythe Danner and John Rubinstein), only to find that no one is interested in her problems. more...
  • Hello, My Name Is Doris
  • Hello, My Name Is Doris (R)

    After more than a decade doing TV, writer-director Michael Showalter (The Baxter, Wet Hot American Summer) returns with another of his wacky but endearingly sweet rom-coms, this one about a May-December office crush. more...