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  • War Dogs
  • War Dogs (R)

    I would never have pegged party-boy director Todd Phillips (Old School, The Hangover) as someone to render a public service, but he's done so with this fact-based satire about war profiteering during the U.S. occupation of Iraq. more...
  • The Way Way Back (PG-13)

    Nice comedic work from Sam Rockwell and Allison Janney buoys this pleasant but routine coming-of-age drama by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. more...
  • We Bought a Zoo (PG)

    A wretchedly cloying script by Aline Brosh McKenna (Morning Glory, 27 Dresses) gets an impressive makeover from director Cameron Crowe (Almost Famous, Jerry Maguire). more...
  • We Have a Pope (NR)

    The films of Italian writer-director-actor Nanni Moretti (Caro Diario, The Son's Room) mete out their narrative developments so casually that they often appear formless; only in hindsight do they reveal a profound understanding of the rhythms of everyday life. more...
  • Where Do We Go Now? (PG-13)

    From its opening image—women clad in black, marching to a graveyard—this Lebanese feature by Nadine Labaki dwells on the crushing weight of grief, yet it returns again and again to the inventive spirit of comedy. more...
  • While We're Young
  • While We're Young (R)

    For better and for worse, this light comedy finds Noah Baumbach at his most Woody Allen-esque; the storytelling is smooth and assured and the one-liners are generally enjoyable, but the worldview is so narrow as to suggest that the experience of upper-middle-class New Yorkers represents all humanity. more...
  • Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?
  • Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow? (NR)

    In the opening minutes of this Taiwanese comedy, an elderly optometrist announces his retirement and then, standing in the street outside his shop, opens his umbrella and floats away like Mary Poppins. more...
  • Win Win (R)

    Thomas McCarthy was a busy character actor before turning that experience to his advantage as writer-director of The Station Agent (2003) and The Visitor (2007); both movies profited from his patient character development and adroit casting. more...