Film Search | Chicago Reader

You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Camille

    The Dumas story of a tubercular courtesan is a classic only in its unrelenting morbidity, but George Cukor makes it work, accenting the oozing romantic fatalism with marvelously fresh open-air sequences and lively playing (1937). more...
  • Faust

    The great F.W. Murnau directed only one real blockbuster in Germany, just before coming to America to make his masterpiece, Sunrise; extravagant in every sense, Faust (1926) is laden with references to Dutch, German, and Italian painting and was rivaled only by Fritz Lang's Metropolis in driving the UFA studio toward bankruptcy. more...
  • Footlight Parade

    One of the best of the Warner Brothers showbiz musicals (1933), with James Cagney turning in a dynamite performance as an enterprising producer, and Busby Berkeley contributing some of his most engaging and bizarre production numbers (including his first water ballet, “By a Waterfall”). more...
  • Hellzapoppin'

    Rarely shown in the U.S. these days, this 1941 film of the wildly deconstructive stage farce with Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson is still regarded as a classic in Europe, and it lives up to its reputation. more...
  • Hedlzapoppin'

    Rarely shown in the U.S. these days, this 1941 film of the wildly deconstructive stage farce with Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson is still regarded as a classic in Europe, and it lives up to its reputation. more...
  • It's a Gift

    W.C. Fields is a small-town grocer who inherits a fortune, buys an orange grove in California, and piles his wife and kids into their ramshackle car for a journey west. more...
  • Lady Windermere's Fan

    One of Ernst Lubitsch's greatest accomplishments, this 1925 filming of the Oscar Wilde classic neatly synthesizes the best elements of silent comedy and melodrama without ever falling into either trivia or heavy-handedness. more...
  • The Long Voyage Home

    The revisionist view of this 1940 adaptation by John Ford and Dudley Nichols of four one-act plays by Eugene O'Neill downgrades it in favor of the once-neglected Ford westerns—in large part because, unlike the westerns, it was widely praised when it first came out. more...