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  • Halloween II

    Rob Zombie’s directing debut, House of a Thousand Corpses (2003), had a kind of diseased grindhouse integrity, but this umpteenth feature about the unstoppable masked killer Michael Myers could be the work of any journeyman, give or take a few hundred gratuitous pop-culture references. more...
  • Hands of Steel (R)

    Ostensibly a Terminator spin-off (1986), though the pointless zooms, empty angles, cookie-cutter editing, and generically bouncy music put you in mind of a failed TV pilot, or maybe an excruciatingly extended episode of The Incredible Hulk, with aspiring hulkoid Daniel Greene as the Lou Ferrigno stand-in. more...
  • Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters (R)

    The idea of recasting the little fairy-tale characters as action heroes is so silly it might have worked had it been played for laughs, but director and cowriter Tommy Wirkola (best known for the "Nazi zombie" flick Dead Snow) just uses it as a pretext for fight scenes in the fashion of video games. more...
  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

    Like its predecessors, this sixth installment in the behemoth fantasy franchise outstays its welcome by a bum-numbing half hour; unlike them, it devotes about half its screen time to chaste, multisided romantic intrigues, the boy wizard (Daniel Radcliffe) and his coed cohorts having attained exquisite young adulthood. more...
  • The Heir Apparent: Largo Winch (NR)

    Contrary to what you might think, Largo Winch is not a piece of construction equipment but an action hero created by Jean Van Hamme for a series of Belgian novels in the 1970s, and subsequently adapted to comic books, TV, and movies. more...
  • Hero (R)

    On the eve of China's first dynasty, a mysterious man (Jet Li) explains to a warlord how he eliminated three assassins, but his story keeps changing as the warlord questions him; each version of the events is signified visually by a dominant color. more...
  • High Plains Drifter

    Clint Eastwood, in his second directorial outing (1973), turns in an elaborate hommage to his Professor Higgins—Sergio Leone (Mr. Two Beega Eyes himself)—full of delirious color symbolism and macho cruelties, but not without its humor as well. more...