Film Search | Chicago Reader

You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Lemming

    Brilliantly conceived and competently executed, this disturbing psychological thriller by German-born French filmmaker Dominik Moll (With a Friend Like Harry) has been compared to David Lynch's Lost Highway, in part because of its uncanny two-part construction. more...
  • Lemon Tree

    The striking Palestinian actress Hiam Abbass (The Visitor) stars in this ironic 2008 melodrama, as a widow whose humble citrus groves make global headlines. more...
  • Lenny Cooke
  • Lenny Cooke

    For their first nonfiction feature, New York-based indie filmmakers Joshua and Benny Safdie (Daddy Longlegs) tell the story of a one-time pro-basketball hopeful who lapsed into obscurity after failing to make the NBA draft in 2002. more...
  • La Leon

    In this 2007 Argentinean drama by Santiago Otheguy, the hushed waters and enveloping jungle of the Parana Delta conceal undercurrents of lust, shame, and anger. more...
  • The Leopard (PG)

    Cut, dubbed, and printed in an inferior color process, the U.S. release of Luchino Visconti's epic didn't leave much of an impression in 1963; 20 years later, a restoration of the much longer Italian version revealed this as not only Visconti's greatest film but a work that transcends its creator, achieving a sensitivity and intelligence without parallel in his other films. more...
    • Tags:
  • Les Choses de la Vie
  • Les Choses de la Vie

    Earlier this month Gene Siskel Film Center presented My Journey Through French Cinema, a 200-minute essay film by the venerable writer-director Bertrand Tavernier (Round Midnight, Life and Nothing But) that presents his country's movies through the lens of personal reminiscence—much as Martin Scorsese did with My Voyage to Italy (1999) and A Personal Journey With Martin Scorsese Through American Movies (1995). more...
    • Tags:
  • Let the Bullets Fly (NR)

    This period action comedy by Jiang Wen (Devils on the Doorstep) is great fun in the Shakespearean tradition, stuffed with lively characters, dramatic stand-offs, and stolen-identity subplots. more...
  • Let the Fire Burn

    Jason Osder's gripping documentary revisits the notorious 1985 police raid against the black liberation group MOVE in west Philadelphia, in which a bomb dropped from a police helicopter onto the group's heavily fortified headquarters ignited a fire that killed six adults and five children and destroyed 60 surrounding homes. more...
  • Let the Right One In (R)

    Like George A. Romero's horror classic Martin (1977), this Swedish shocker mixes vampire mythology with adolescent melancholy, and just as the earlier film was rooted in reality by its run-down Pittsburgh locations, this one draws heavily on its working-class setting, a drab suburb of Stockholm. more...
  • Let the Sunshine In
  • Let the Sunshine In

    Loosely inspired by Roland Barthes’ nonfiction book A Lover's Discourse: Fragments—which dives into the absurd language of solitude and mythology that lovers and would-be lovers recite to themselves and others—this rapturous and faintly comic concerto for Juliette Binoche may well be the most pleasurable and original film Claire Denis has made since Beau Travail (1999). more...
  • Let's Be Friends

    Two losers in love—a pale nebbish (Jean-Paul Rouve) and an older divorced man (Gerard Depardieu)—band together in their dating efforts, a functional relationship whose ups and downs turn out to be the real subject of this romantic comedy by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano. more...
  • Let's Go With Pancho Villa!

    Despite its commercial failure, this 1935 feature, the last installment of Fernando de Fuentes's trilogy on the Mexican revolution, remained his favorite film. more...
  • Let's Make Love

    Although this 1960 movie is usually accorded a low place in the Marilyn Monroe canon—understandably so, because the comedy and musical numbers never quite take off the way they're supposed to—it deserves to be reevaluated for the intelligence of Monroe's performance and the rare independence of her character; this one was made after her brush with Actors Studio, and she isn't playing a bimbo. more...