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  • Flowers of Shanghai

    Based on a famous 19th-century Chinese novel, Hou Hsiao-hsien's 1998 drama is set in an upscale Shanghai brothel, a claustrophobic artificial paradise where courtesans and their upper-class clients smoke opium, argue about money, and indulge in witty gossip. more...
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  • The Flowers of War (R)

    This historical drama by Chinese director Zhang Yimou may not stack up to his magisterial actioner House of Flying Daggers (2004), but it's more focused and deeply felt than his last three U.S. releases (Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles, Curse of the Golden Flower, and A Woman, a Gun and a Noodle Shop). more...
  • Flowing (NR)

    Brimful and elusive, like the Heraclitean river that forever moves while standing still, Mikio Naruse's 1956 masterpiece, about a geisha house come on hard times (and not incidentally running athwart modernizing currents in Japanese culture), poises at the indefinable edge of variation and stasis, between evanescent incident and immutable form. more...
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  • Flushed Away

    A collaboration between DreamWorks Animation and the UK's Aardman Features, this delightful computer animation is less twee than Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, with more action and a broader American sensibility. more...
  • A Fly in the Ashes

    This gripping Argentinean drama (2009) depicts the nightmarish predicament of two young rural women who are lured to Buenos Aires by job openings for domestics but instead find themselves enslaved as prostitutes. more...
  • Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman

    The best miniseries I've seen this year, The Trap: What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom, made by Adam Curtis for the BBC, hasn't reached U.S. screens yet (although you can find it online). more...
  • The Foliage

    The puffy-lipped Shu Qi is the current reigning beauty queen of Chinese cinema: even dressed in olive drab fatigues, she's the main attraction in this drama about jealousy during the Cultural Revolution. more...
  • Following Sean

    Documentary filmmaker Ralph Arlyck first won notice with his 15-minute short Sean (1969), a black-and-white portrait of a four-year-old ragamuffin who lived with his hippie parents in Haight-Ashbury. more...
  • Food, Inc.

    Smart, gripping, and untainted by the influence of Michael Moore, this muckraking 2008 documentary transcends anticorporate demonology to build a visceral but reasoned case against modern agribusiness. more...
  • A Fool
  • A Fool

    Based on a popular Chinese novella, this 2014 directorial debut by actor Chen Jianbin reveals a humanist core beneath layers of dry irony and cynicism. more...
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  • Foolish Wives

    Little more than half of Erich von Stroheim's 1921 film survives as he designed it, yet its epic view of postwar European decadence is still staggering. more...
  • Footlight Parade

    One of the best of the Warner Brothers showbiz musicals (1933), with James Cagney turning in a dynamite performance as an enterprising producer, and Busby Berkeley contributing some of his most engaging and bizarre production numbers (including his first water ballet, “By a Waterfall”). more...
  • Footnotes
  • Footnotes

    A delightful film about serious matters, this 2016 musical comedy uses the winning story of a successful labor strike at a shoe factory to consider the impact of France's ongoing recession on the working class. more...