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  • The Square
  • The Square (R)

    "Do you want to save a human life?" asks a woman distributing flyers outside a museum of modern art in Stockholm; the unvarying reply from people on the street is "No." Welcome to the world of Swedish writer-director Ruben Östlund, who takes some wicked pot shots at the business of art but more broadly ponders the breakdown of the social contract among all people. more...
  • A Man Called Ove
  • A Man Called Ove (PG-13)

    Two of the most hackneyed scenes ever are the comically interrupted suicide attempt and the lonely soliloquy addressed to a dead spouse's headstone; the title character (Rolf Lassgård) gets them both, multiple times, in this slow and obvious Swedish drama. more...
  • Paterson
  • Paterson (R)

    The eponymous New Jersey town proves to be a hotbed of poetry and art in this comedy from writer-director Jim Jarmusch, thanks to his beautifully loony conceit that all ordinary Americans are closet poets and artists of one kind or another (even if they don't always know it). more...
  • Elle
  • Elle (R)

    Dutch writer-director Paul Verhoeven, making his first French-language film, returns to the themes of sexual perversion and errant womanhood he mined in Basic Instinct (1992) and Showgirls (1995). more...
  • Whiplash
  • Whiplash (R)

    "There are no two words in the English language more harmful than good job," declares Terence Fletcher, the viciously demanding jazz instructor in Damien Chazelle's Whiplash. more...
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  • Saving Mes Aynak
  • Saving Mes Aynak

    Less a finished feature than an emergency bulletin, this one-hour documentary surveys the situation on the ground in Mes Aynak, an area southwest of Kabul, Afghanistan, that is prized by archaeologists for its buried antiquities and by a Chinese mining company for its rich copper deposits. more...
  • The Armstrong Lie (R)

    Liars are Alex Gibney's specialty: among the subjects of his best documentaries are such world-class prevaricators as Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room), Jack Abramoff (Casino Jack and the United States of Money), and Eliot Spitzer (Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer). more...
  • Putney Swope

    Robert Downey Sr.'s low-budget, hit-or-miss dadaist (or gagaist) 1969 satire, about a group of blacks taking over a Madison Avenue ad agency, is a bit of a relic now, though a decidedly offbeat one. more...
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