Film Search | Chicago Reader
  • The Armstrong Lie (R)

    Liars are Alex Gibney's specialty: among the subjects of his best documentaries are such world-class prevaricators as Ken Lay and Jeff Skilling (Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room), Jack Abramoff (Casino Jack and the United States of Money), and Eliot Spitzer (Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer). more...
  • A Body Without Organs

    First-time director Stephen Graves crafts an intimate portrait of his father, Bill Graves, a former doctor who's barely left home since a rare medical condition forced surgeons to remove his colon and parts of his intestines in 1997. more...
  • The Camera Obscura

    This muted 2008 melodrama tells the familiar story of an ugly duckling—complete with frizzy hair and glasses—whose self-confidence blooms only after she finds true love. more...
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  • Cutter's Way

    A handsome, ambitious film that fails to satisfy—perhaps because the director, Ivan Passer, insists on an ambiguity on the plot level that muddies and dilutes the thematic thrust. more...
  • Dirty Wars (NR)

    The flood of theatrical documentaries about the War on Terror—Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004), Why We Fight (2005), The Ground Truth (2006), No End in Sight (2007), Taxi to the Dark Side (2007), Standard Operating Procedure (2008)—has slowed to a trickle since President Obama took office, which makes this uncompromising exposé from reporter Jeremy Scahill even more important. more...
  • Elle
  • Elle (R)

    Dutch writer-director Paul Verhoeven, making his first French-language film, returns to the themes of sexual perversion and errant womanhood he mined in Basic Instinct (1992) and Showgirls (1995). more...
  • Hit & Stay

    Heartfelt and informative, this historical documentary considers the role of civil disobedience in the anti-Vietnam War movement, focusing on the efforts of priests, nuns, and other devout Catholics. more...
  • The House I Live In

    No one can accuse Eugene Jarecki of thinking small: his masterful 2005 documentary Why We Fight took on no less than the military-industrial complex, and his new one plunges into the 40-year, $1 trillion war on drugs. more...
  • Intolerance

    D.W. Griffith's 1916 masterpiece, described by Pauline Kael as "perhaps the greatest movie ever made and the greatest folly in movie history," cuts among four stories linked by images of Lillian Gish and a quote from Whitman ("Out of the cradle, endlessly rocking . . ."). more...