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  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence (PG-13)

    A collaboration between the living Steven Spielberg and the late Stanley Kubrick seems appropriate to a project that reflects profoundly on the differences between life and nonlife. more...
  • Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery (PG-13)

    After 30 years of cryogenic preservation, the title hero (a James Bond knockoff) and his archenemy Dr. Evil—both played by writer and coproducer Mike Myers—emerge to match wits all over again. more...
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  • Batman (PG-13)

    Tim Burton directs Michael Keaton in the title role (1989). more...
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  • Best in Show (PG-13)

    I found this 2000 follow-up to Waiting for Guffman funnier than its predecessor, in part because the characters are regarded with more affection and less snobbery, even if most are still yokels. more...
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  • Big Fish (PG-13)

    A young man (Billy Crudup) comes to terms with his dying, self-mythologizing father (Albert Finney) in this 2003 fantasy directed by Tim Burton (Ed Wood, Mars Attacks!) more...
  • Biloxi Blues (PG-13)

    Based on a play that constitutes part two of Neil Simon's autobiographical trilogy, concerned with the experiences of the hero (Matthew Broderick) at boot camp in Biloxi, Mississippi, in 1943, this is an engaging, well-crafted comedy that receives very able direction from Mike Nichols. more...
  • The Brothers Grimm (PG-13)

    This brisk, free-falling fantasy (2005) about the famous collators of German fairy tales, played here as a kind of comedy act by Matt Damon and Heath Ledger, is Terry Gilliam's most entertaining work since the glory days of Time Bandits, Brazil, The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, and The Fisher King. more...
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer (PG-13)

    Buffy (Kristy Swanson) is a high school cheerleader who discovers from an ancient guru (Donald Sutherland) that she's the latest in a series of girls fated to slay vampires, with the aid of acrobatic kicks, pirouettes, and wooden stakes (1992). more...
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  • Chicago (PG-13)

    The story here started out in 1926 as a play by Maurine Dallas Watkins, eventually became William Wellman's cynical film satire Roxie Hart (1942), then resurfaced as a stage musical by Fred Ebb and Bob Fosse. more...
  • A Civil Action (PG-13)

    A multifaceted misfire from writer-director Steven Zaillian that is especially disappointing as a follow-up to his first feature, Searching for Bobby Fischer, made with many members of that film's production team. more...
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  • Clueless (PG-13)

    If you gave up on writer-director Amy Heckerling after Look Who's Talking and its sequel, this 1995 comedy—improbably but cleverly adapted by Heckerling from Jane Austen's Emma—might get you interested again. more...
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  • Crimes and Misdemeanors (PG-13)

    The first “serious” Woody Allen film with Jewish characters (1989) might seem like an improvement after the pseudoprofundities of Interiors et al, but it can't be said to dig any deeper. more...
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  • Dances With Wolves (PG-13)

    Kevin Costner starred, coproduced, and made his directorial debut in this three-hour epic (1990) about a Union lieutenant in the 1860s who gradually becomes a member of a Sioux tribe in the Dakotas. more...
  • Danzon (PG-13)

    A single mother (Maria Rojo) who's pushing 40 spends every Wednesday night dancing in a Mexico City ballroom with a 50ish partner (Daniel Rergis); when he mysteriously runs away to Veracruz, she goes looking for him. more...
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