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  • An Affair to Remember

    Leo McCarey's 1957 remake of his 1939 masterpiece Love Affair, coscripted with Delmer Daves and shot in color and 'Scope, is his last great film—a tearjerker with comic interludes and cosmic undertones that fully earns both its tears and its laughs, despite some kitschy notions about art and a couple of truly dreadful sequences. more...
  • Alice

    This time Woody Allen's irresolute, neurotic, and masochistic stand-in protagonist is Alice Tate (Mia Farrow), a very upscale housewife and lapsed Catholic with an unappreciative husband (William Hurt). more...
  • Alila

    Israeli filmmaker Amos Gitai (who speaks the credits over the opening footage) loosely adapts Yehoshua Knaz's novel Returning Lost Loves into a mosaic of about 40 scenes, each an extended take photographed by the masterful Renata Berta. more...
  • Arthur and the Invisibles

    An enterprising ten-year-old (Freddie Highmore), hoping to save his granny (Mia Farrow) from a foreclosure on her house, shrinks himself and enters the land of the tiny Minimoys in her backyard to recover some rubies buried by his grandfather. more...
  • Asylum

    David Mackenzie, who directed the remarkable Scottish drama Young Adam (2003), delivers another masterful, disturbing tale of illicit passion, erotic obsession, and sudden death set in the 1950s. more...
  • Bamako (NR)

    A large portion of this highly original 2006 feature from Mali by Abderrahmane Sissako (Life on Earth, Waiting for Happiness) consists of a hearing devoted to the operations of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in Africa, with judge, black and white lawyers, and witnesses all played by nonactors who've written their own speeches, many of them angry. more...
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  • Bedazzled

    I had fun with this Harold Ramis remake of the 1968 Stanley Donen comedy—about an obnoxious nebbish who strikes a Faustian bargain with the devil—as long as I didn't worry about the character of the nebbish, played by Brendan Fraser, who starts off unbelievably stupid and winds up ridiculously enlightened. more...