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  • What's the Matter With Kansas?

    Entertaining and eye-opening, this documentary based on Thomas Frank's best-selling book investigates how voters in the Jayhawk State switched from the left to the right. more...
  • What's a Human, Anyway?

    After a cabdriver loses his memory in a traffic accident, the neighbors in his Istanbul apartment complex keep close tabs on him, though some—especially his father—think that he's faking. more...
  • What's Eating Gilbert Grape (PG-13)

    Even if you have a taste as I do for movies about dysfunctional families, you may be a little put off by the Grapes in this 1993 adaptation by Peter Hedges of his own novel: no father, 500-pound mother, mentally disabled son (especially good work by Leonardo DiCaprio), and two daughters, as well as Johnny Depp to more or less hold things together. more...
  • What's Up, Tiger Lily?

    Arguably Woody Allen's funniest movie (as well as his first), though he acts as if he'd prefer to forget it today, this redubbing of a Japanese James Bond spin-off bristles with loony invention and energy. more...
  • What's Wrong With Frank Chin?

    There's much more right with Frank Chin, the outspoken Chinese-American novelist, playwright, and intellectual: in the 1970s his pioneering media studies skewered pop-culture stereotypes like Charlie Chan, and by spearheading the first-ever Asian American writers' conference he opened doors for an entire generation of authors. more...
  • When It Rains

    One of my all-time favorite films, this beautiful 12-minute short by Charles Burnett (Killer of Sheep, The Glass Shield), made for French TV in 1995, is a jazz parable about locating common roots in contemporary Watts and one of those rare movies in which jazz forms directly influence film narrative. more...
  • When the Wind Blows

    Director Jimmy Murakami and screenwriter Raymond Briggs's English 1986 animated feature gets us to think the unthinkable—to imagine the aftereffects of a nuclear holocaust—by creating a very funny and believable elderly English couple, still mired in memories of World War II. more...
  • Where Lies Your Hidden Smile?

    It isn't necessary to have seen anything by Jean-Marie Straub and the late Daniele Huillet to appreciate this sublime and often hilarious 2001 account of their editing a film together. more...