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  • Phantom

    F.W. Murnau made this feature the same year (1922) as his much better known Nosferatu, but it isn't a fantasy or horror picture, as the title might suggest. more...
  • Phantom Boy
  • Phantom Boy

    In this moving 2015 animation by Alain Gagnol and Jean-Loup Felicioli (A Cat in Paris), a young cancer patient with the power to leave his body helps a cop whose legs have been broken bring down a criminal mastermind holding New York City hostage. more...
  • Phantom India

    Louis Malle's seven-part, 378-minute 1968 documentary series is one of my favorites among his works. more...
  • Phantom Love

    Unfolding with the awful clarity of a nightmare, this 2007 drama delves into the troubled psyche of a remote Russian beauty (Marina Shoif) who spends her days dully working a roulette table in LA's Koreatown and her nights lying beneath a sweating, mechanically pumping lover. more...
  • Phantom of the Opera (NR)

    Critics rank this 1925 feature by Rupert Julian well below Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but Lon Chaney's performance as the hideous organist prowling the sewers beneath the Paris Opera is still a cornerstone of gothic horror. more...
  • Pharoah
  • Pharoah

    There's a marked anti-Soviet subtext to this 1966 Polish drama—a fictional pharaoh tries to bring democratic reforms to Egypt, only to clash with corrupt ministers who have a stranglehold on the government—yet it's thoroughly commanding as a period spectacle. more...
  • Phase II

    Lukas Schmid's 2002 documentary about a Swiss facility for adolescents with drug problems could have been called “Reform School Boys,” except that it's not in the least exploitative. more...
  • The Phenix City Story

    Phil Karlson's noirish 1955 docudrama about organized crime is authentically seedy, shot in Alabama with adept use of many locals and an unusual candor about racist violence. more...
  • Philanthropy

    Nae Caranfil's corrosively funny satire takes place in a faraway land populated by idle rich, working poor, and a middle class consisting entirely of stray dogs—in other words, contemporary Romania. more...
  • Philomena (PG-13)

    Adapted from a book by Martin Sixsmith, this absorbing drama recounts the British journalist's relationship with Philomena Lee, an Irish woman who bore a child out of wedlock in the 1950s and was forced by nuns at the Roscrea convent to surrender it for adoption. more...
  • The Photographer, His Wife, Her Lover

    A real-life noir mystery, this fascinating documentary by Paul Yule chronicles the tempestuous relationship between O. Winston Link, whose black-and-white photographs memorialized the last American steam trains, and Conchita Mendoza, his wife and manager. more...
  • Photographic Memory

    Ross McElwee is a poet of memory and, on a larger scale, history: his classic documentary Sherman's March (1986) began as a chronicle of the Union general's devastating campaign through the Confederate south but eventually grew into a comic confessional about McElwee's romantic misadventures as he was making the film. more...
  • The Pianist (R)

    Roman Polanski's 2002 film about classical pianist Wladyslaw Szpilman (Adrien Brody), a Polish Jew who managed to survive the Warsaw ghetto, won the top prize at Cannes and an Oscar for best director, and it's easy to understand why: Polanski, himself a survivor of the Krakow ghetto, is so authoritative in showing us what life there was like that this film makes more conventional heart tuggers like Schindler's List shrivel to insignificance. more...