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  • The Patience Stone (R)

    In an unnamed Middle Eastern country in the throes of civil war, a woman (Golshifteh Farahani) struggles to protect her young children and comatose husband, a well-known jihadist a few decades her senior; with no one else to protect her, this docile wife and mother belatedly comes into her own. more...
  • Patriot Acts

    The Bush administration's heartless and xenophobic new immigration policies, which often imply that “we” have more to fear from ordinary Muslims than from people like Timothy McVeigh, have had real human consequences, and this video documentary by Sree Nallamothu examines just a couple of cases. more...
  • Paul (R)

    Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the inspired British duo who spoofed horror movies in Shaun of the Dead and cop thrillers in Hot Fuzz, star as sci-fi fanboys who arrive in the U.S. for a comic-book convention and, piloting their RV through Area 51, pick up an escaped space alien with the voice of Seth Rogen. more...
  • Paul Goodman Changed My Life (NR)

    In this heady documentary, TV footage of left-wing social critic Paul Goodman being interviewed by conservative host William F. Buckley Jr. in 1966 makes one realize how low public discourse in America has sunk since then: despite the men's political differences, their freewheeling discussion, touching on topics from education to pornography, is playful instead of rancorous. more...
  • Pauline at the Beach (R)

    The third entry in Eric Rohmer's "Comedies and Proverbs" series (1983) takes a further step in exteriority over the intimacy of the “Six Moral Tales,” borrowing a mistaken-identity plot that embroils the six major characters in the cold machinations of a conventional sex farce. more...
  • Pavilion

    This lyrical drama, which finds its aesthetic somewhere between the long takes of Gus Van Sant's Elephant (2003) and the intimate, home-movie feel in much of Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life (2011), captures adolescence at its most wistful. more...
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  • The Pearl Button
  • The Pearl Button

    Patricio Guzman, who chronicled the military coup against Salvador Allende in his documentary trilogy The Battle of Chile (1975-'79), has begun, in old age, to process his political experiences through stunning personal essay films about the geography and astronomy of his native land. more...
  • The Pearls of the Crown

    Henry II dies in a quizzical jump cut, Arletty's voice is run backward to suggest the speech of an Abyssinian snake princess, and writer-director Sacha Guitry plays several parts (including Francis I, Napoleon III, and himself telling the film's story to his wife). more...
  • A Peck on the Cheek

    A young Indian writer decides to adopt a Sri Lankan baby, but because the law prohibits single men from adopting, he also proposes marriage to a beautiful young woman from his village. more...
  • Peep “TV” Show

    I headed the critics' jury at Rotterdam in 2004 that gave its top prize to Yutaka Tsuchiya's exceedingly weird “fiction documentary” video about teenyboppers drifting around Shibuya, Tokyo's fashionable shopping district. more...
  • Peeping Tom (NR)

    Michael Powell's suppressed masterpiece, made in 1960 but sparsely shown in the U.S. with its ferocity and compassion intact. more...
  • Peggy and Fred in Hell: The Complete Cycle

    Leslie Thornton's remarkable, mind-boggling experimental feature-length cycle of short films, worked on and released in episodes over a period of years—a postapocalyptic narrative about two children feeling their way through the refuse of late-20th-century consumer culture; the films employ a wide array of found footage as well as peculiar, unpredictable, and often funny performances from two “found” actors. more...
  • Penelope

    More tart than sweet, this contemporary fairy tale provides a worthy vehicle for the fearless Christina Ricci. more...
  • Pennies From Heaven

    Ironic, alienating musicals have been tried before (Pal Joey onstage, It's Always Fair Weather on film), but never with such lofty contempt for the form. more...