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  • The Man Nobody Knew (NR)

    "He was tougher, smarter, smoother, and could be crueler than anybody I ever knew," says Carl Colby of his father, the controversial central intelligence director William Colby, in a voice-over for this fascinating documentary. more...
  • Man of Cinema: Pierre Rissient

    Sometimes the most powerful and influential people are protected by their relative obscurity, and it's hard to think of a better illustration of this principle in the film world than the multifaceted, eccentric, controversial Pierre Rissient, whom I've known for 35 years. more...
  • The Man of My Life

    Zabou Breitman's 2006 drama is a feast, a psychologically complex, emotionally satisfying idyll in the French countryside during which her success-track characters slow down enough to get in touch with some inner truths. more...
  • Man of Tai Chi (R)

    Keanu Reeves makes his directorial debut with this satisfying pastiche of Hong Kong action cinema, incorporating knock-out martial arts choreography (courtesy of the great Yuen Woo-ping), operatic brutality reminiscent of John Woo, balletic camera movements a la Johnnie To, and even some of Jackie Chan’s populist humor. more...
  • Man of the West

    This late CinemaScope western (1958) by the great Anthony Mann achieves a tragic intensity and a monumental scenic splendor despite some serious handicaps: a stagy villain (Lee J. Cobb), an awkward lead actress (Julie London), and a screenwriter accustomed to working with confined spaces (TV dramatist Reginald Rose), none of whom complement the film's quintessentially cinematic hero (Gary Cooper in one of his last and best performances). more...
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  • Man on a Ledge (PG-13)

    Asger Leth, best known for the political documentary Ghosts of Cité Soleil (2006), isn't someone I expected to revive the taut, unpretentious crime filmmaking that flourished in 1950s Hollywood, but this noirish thriller is as self-knowingly ludicrous and thoroughly enjoyable as Fritz Lang's Beyond a Reasonable Doubt or While the City Sleeps. more...
  • Man on Fire

    Tony Scott (The Hunger, Enemy of the State) is often dismissed for the trademark high-gloss visuals he perfected as a director of TV commercials, but no filmmaker in Hollywood today does foreboding better. more...
  • Man on Wire (PG-13)

    James Marsh's documentary revisits the legendary stunt in which French wire walker Philippe Petit crossed between the twin towers of the World Trade Center in August 1974. more...
  • Man Push Cart

    Haunting and touching, this feature by Iranian-American filmmaker Ramin Bahrani focuses on a former Pakistani rock singer (Ahmad Razvi) who hawks coffee and bagels from a pushcart in Manhattan. more...
  • The Man Who Laughs

    Director Paul Leni, whose career was cut short by his death from blood poisoning in 1929, is best remembered for his creaky, campy haunted-house movie The Cat and the Canary, but this elegant Victor Hugo adaptation (1928) gives a much better sense of his considerable dramatic and pictorial talents. more...
  • The Man Who Left His Will on Film

    One of Nagisa Oshima's most perceptive and self-conscious films, this 1970 study of the sensibility of youth tells of a student making a film—which turns out to be his last will and testament when he kills himself at the end of it. more...
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  • The Man Without a Past

    Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki perfects his trademark formula of deadpan humor and arctic circle pathos in this brilliantly ironic 2002 comedy. more...
  • Manchester by the Sea
  • Manchester by the Sea (R)

    The three films written and directed by Kenneth Lonergan—You Can Count on Me (2000), Margaret (2011), and his latest, Manchester by the Sea—all deal with grief, guilt, responsibility, and connection. more...
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