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  • In the Shadow of Women
  • In the Shadow of Women

    In this mordantly funny drama (2015) from French writer-director Philippe Garrel (Regular Lovers), a husband-and-wife team of documentary filmmakers work on a project about the French resistance while their personal lives are roiled by mutual infidelity. more...
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  • In the Valley of Elah

    Paul Haggis follows up his Oscar-winning Crash with this searing drama that uses the police procedural to explore the moral and psychological devastation of the Iraq war for U.S. soldiers (and, incidentally, for Iraqi citizens). more...
  • In Those Days

    A fine example of the “rubble films” released in Germany after World War II, this heartfelt 1947 drama follows the life of an automobile from its construction in 1933, when the Reichstag was torched, to its final days in a junkyard in 1945. more...
  • In Vanda's Room

    Pedro Costa's longest and most challenging film (2000) is also the one in which he most fully discovers his present method (shooting beautifully composed tableaux without camera movement in digital video, with scripted dialogue) and subject matter (immigrants from Cape Verde and junkies, all nonprofessional actors playing themselves, inhabiting hovels in a Lisbon slum that are audibly and visibly being razed). more...
  • In Your Hands

    The monkish aesthetic of the Dogma 95 manifesto—handheld camera, natural light, no music score—enhances this probing 2004 spiritual drama by Danish writer-director Annette K. Olesen. more...
  • Incendies (R)

    In this harrowing Canadian drama, a civil war that consumed a Middle Eastern country decades earlier has devastating repercussions for a survivor and her children in Montreal. more...
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  • Incident at Loch Ness

    In this sly mockumentary, Zak Penn persuades German filmmaker Werner Herzog to direct a documentary on the Loch Ness monster. more...
  • An Inconvenient Truth

    A movie of Al Gore lecturing on global warming may sound dull beyond measure, but this documentary by Davis Guggenheim is hugely dramatic, arguing that the world's governments have little more than a decade to avert a planetary disaster. more...
  • The Incredible Shrinking Man (NR)

    A scientist (Grant Williams) exposed to radiation grows smaller and smaller in this faithful 1957 adaptation of a bad Richard Matheson novel; it's a lot more interesting than its source, thanks to the special effects and Jack Arnold's taut, no-nonsense direction. more...
  • Indestructible

    Chicago actor and playwright Ben Byer had long dreamed of a career in movies, but he became a filmmaker almost incidentally: after being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis—ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease—in 2002, the 31-year-old turned a camera on himself and his family as they embarked on a global search for palliative treatments. more...
  • India Song

    There's so little to the subjects in Marguerite Duras' films—here it's that old favorite, doomed love among the rotting aristocracy—that it's easy to think of her as the most perverse of minimalists. more...
  • Indignation
  • Indignation (R)

    This drama about a bright young Jewish boy from Newark attending a small, midwestern liberal arts college in the 1950s was adapted from a novel by Philip Roth, so you know you're in for some pretty heavy philosophy and some pretty good head. more...
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  • Infernal Affairs

    A runaway hit in Hong Kong, this 2002 crime thriller reinvigorated the genre with its airtight script, taut editing, and sleek cinematography (Christopher Doyle served as visual consultant). more...
  • Infernal Affairs II

    The second installment of Andrew Lau and Alan Mak's Hong Kong-based trilogy is a prequel that brings two of the previous film's characters, police inspector Wong (Anthony Wong) and triad underboss Sam (Eric Tsang), to the forefront, revealing how their guarded respect for each other deteriorated into a bitter personal feud. more...