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  • Big Fan (R)

    Movies about obsessed fans are invariably creepy (Misery, The King of Comedy, Play Misty for Me), but in this one nobody suffers worse than the fan himself. more...
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  • The Big Heat

    Fritz Lang's sizzling 1953 film noir masterpiece features Glenn Ford (in his best performance—perhaps his only performance) as an anguished cop out to smash a maddeningly effete mobster (Alexander Scourby) and break the hold he has on a corrupt city administration. more...
  • The Big Lebowski (R)

    Probably the Coen brothers' most enjoyable movie—glittering with imagination, cleverness, and filmmaking skill—though, as in their other films, the warm feelings they generate around a couple of salt-of-the-earth types don't apply to anyone else in the cast: you might as well be scraping them off your shoe. more...
  • Big Man Japan (PG-13)

    Whenever Tokyo is getting torn up by a giant monster—from the look of things, about once a week—the defense department summons Masaru Daisato, a weary civil servant who climbs into purple underpants the size of a billboard, receives a massive jolt of electricity, and turns into a towering Kewpie doll known as Big Man Japan. more...
  • Big Men

    Rachel Boynton's fine debut documentary Our Brand Is Crisis (2005) explored the deforming effects of U.S. political strategists on a Bolivian presidential election; her second examines the corrupting power of oil money in West Africa, and its opening close-up of wasps clustering around a nest proves aptly symbolic. more...
  • The Big Parade

    A masterpiece, King Vidor's 1925 film about the Great War accomplishes what few war epics ever do: it captures the immense sweep of cataclysmic events while maintaining its focus on the ordinary people whose lives are changed forever by those events. more...
  • The Big Red One: The Reconstruction

    A heroic effort by critic Richard Schickel to reconstruct Samuel Fuller's most ambitious feature—a semiautobiographical account of his own fighting unit during World War II, severely truncated by distributors when first released (in 1980). more...
  • The Big Sky

    Though this sublime 1952 black-and-white masterpiece by Howard Hawks is usually accorded a low place in the Hawks canon, it's a particular favorite of mine—mysterious, beautiful, and even utopian in some of its sexual and cultural aspects. more...
  • The Big Sleep (NR)

    A very good movie (1946), and by far the best Raymond Chandler adaptation, but it isn't one of Howard Hawks's most refined efforts—it lacks his clarity of line, his balance, his sense of a free spirit at play within a carefully set structure. more...
  • The Big Steal

    Ace action director Don Siegel helmed this 1949 Robert Mitchum thriller, only 72 minutes long, with an almost continuous chase involving four sets of characters in Mexico, and it's pretty damn good. more...
  • The Big Uneasy (NR)

    Comedian Harry Shearer directed and serves as onscreen narrator for this absorbing documentary, which exposes the human failure that surrounded the flooding of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. more...
  • Bigger Than Life (NR)

    Nicholas Ray's potent 1956 CinemaScope melodrama dealt with the ill effects of cortisone on a frustrated middle-class grammar-school teacher (James Mason) at about the same time that the first wave of “wonder” drugs hit the market. more...
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