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Monday, November 5, 2018

What we learned at the Chicago Humanities Festival this weekend

Posted By , , , and on 11.05.18 at 05:26 PM

Don't forget Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells
  • Ida B. Wells

Remembering is hard work, and being the guardian of memory for a famous ancestor is even more taxing. Just ask Ida B. Wells's great-granddaughter, Michelle Duster.

Wells was born into slavery in 1862. She became an investigative journalist, an anti-lynching campaigner, and one of the most influential people of her time. An unapologetic intersectional feminist long before that term entered common parlance, Wells co-founded the NAACP and published prolifically. Yet other civil rights and feminist leaders—both black men and white women—resented her radical fervor and outspokenness and sidelined her throughout her life. In 1931 she died in obscurity without so much as an obituary in the New York Times.

The paper of record is trying to remedy that oversight and published a long-overdue tribute to Wells last spring. But the resurrection of Wells’s memory is an ongoing project.

Wells lived in Chicago for many years, at 36th and King Drive, and became the namesake of the city’s first public housing development for black families. With the destruction of the projects her name was erased from the city’s landscape. For the last ten years, Duster has been fundraising to build a monument in Bronzeville to preserve Wells’s memory—often at the expense of her own identity, since most people want to talk to her only about her great grandmother and seem to overlook that she, Michelle, a writer and lecturer at Columbia College, is her own woman.

This year, boosted by the social media activism of some of today's prominent black woman journalists, educators, and organizers, Duster’s family’s dream came one step closer to fruition. In the span of two months, they raised $200,000 to pay for a commission by sculptor Richard Hunt. The sculpture will stand in a small plaza where the Ida B. Wells Homes used to be; after demolition was completed in 2011, they were replaced by a mixed-income community. Last summer, the city also moved to rename Congress Parkway to Ida B. Wells Drive. And people are eager to do more. When asked how else they could keep Wells’s memory alive, Duster responded plainly: "Vote." —Maya Dukmasova


Tom Hanks prefers his sandwiches breadless

Hanks and Sagal, admiring the simultaneous transcription - DAVID T. KINDLER
  • David T. Kindler
  • Hanks and Sagal, admiring the simultaneous transcription

As Tom Hanks strolled out onto the stage, holding hands with NPR’s Peter Sagal, his interviewer for the evening, the audience was palpably star-struck. However, as the these longtime pals, who are two of the more iconic voices of the last few decades, started their conversation, an equally strong sense of ease swept the crowd, as if we were all listening to our cool uncles sharing advice over a couple of pints. This is an odd sensation to have while in the same room as one of the most acclaimed and successful actors of a generation, but that seems to be Tom: hero to many and friend to all.

Hanks has had his fair share of portraying heroes. It’s through his newest role though, as a first-time novelist, that he finally shares what he thinks makes a hero. After writing and putting together his collection of short stories Uncommon Type: Some Stories he had to step back and ask himself "What are the connective tissues that tie these works together?"
None are grand tales with extremely terrible situations or extremely wonderful outcomes. And yet, to Hanks, they are examples of heroism. They are all studies of people's ability to make it through each day and still feel good about themselves, aided by unexpected allies. That's it, and it's the exact same combination of conditions and attitude that shaped the epics of Jim Lovell, Captain Miller, Robert Langdon, Chesley Sullenberger, Ben Bradlee, and Forrest Gump. For Captain Phillips literally and the rest metaphorically, what made them heroes was the constant thought of, "How can I get these people off this boat" and the wherewithal to see it through.

About the bread thing. When asked, by an audience member, what his ideal sandwich would be, Hanks replied that the nutritionist who helps him manage his type 2 diabetes told him that for his metabolism, bread is poison. But adding an egg is always a good idea. Even to oatmeal.

When Sagal asked what his favorite story in the book was, Hanks said it was the one based on his father-in-law’s escape from Communist persecution in Bulgaria. Until pressed on it by Hanks, he had never spoken about his immigration to the United States. He assumed that no one would be interested. To Hanks, it was the pinnacle example of, again, someone just trying to make it through his day, not knowing he is doing so against great odds, but aided by bravery, luck, and the goodness of fair people.

According to Hanks 90 percent of people are good. And, yeah, 5 percent are assholes (with 5 percent unaccounted for) but it’s that far greater majority that matter. Hanks recounted that while growing up in pre-Civil Rights Act Oakland, California, he rode the bus every day. He rode side by side with people of every color, and day in and day out all that happened was that people got on the bus and people got off the bus. He didn’t realize it at the time, but that was extraordinary. That was the 90 percent in action.

Time was nearly up when Hanks and Sagal realized that everything they were saying was being transcribed and flashed on a screen above them, and we learned that if Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Tom Hanks can marvel at something he simply hadn’t yet noticed, then we can all look a little closer at something each day and realize there is something new to be delighted by.

Oh, and to always add an egg. —Brita Hunegs


Dessa has to sign copies of her book even at the airport

Dessa - DAVID T. KINDLER
  • David T. Kindler
  • Dessa

Dessa knows how to entertain people. What's more, the rapper, singer, poet, and author understands how to reach a crowd regardless of whether they're deeply invested in her solo work or the music she's made as part of the independent Minneapolis hip-hop collective Doomtree. So as an introduction to her Chicago Humanities Festival talk at the Chicago Athletic Association on Sunday, she read fragments from the second chapter of her new memoir, My Own Devices: True Stories from the Road on Music, Science, and Senseless Love. That section is laid out as a glossary, and it offers a snapshot of Dessa’s rise through the international independent music circuit.

Her reading showed why she's survived in a brutal industry. Witty, easygoing, and magnetic, Dessa didn't so much read aloud as interact with her writing, at one point enlisting a volunteer to act as her hype-man in order to explain the term "hype." Dessa knows how to wrench life out of the dull and mundane. In My Own Devices, she uses the repetitive rituals of tour life to shed light on her Doomtree compatriots or to consider idiosyncratic questions concerning science and nutrition—like how many cashews she’d have to eat in a day to survive if that’s all she were allowed to consume.

Dessa also discussed the peculiar hiccups she encountered as an indie musician working on a book for a big publisher. The Penguin Random House imprint Dutton is a world away from Rain Taxi, the Minneapolis alternative publisher behind Dessa's 2013 poetry book, A Pound of Steam. Now Dessa has a book publicity team encouraging her to sign copies of My Own Devices at every bookstore where she can spot the memoir. Even in airports—yes, on at least on occasion she got handed a stack of her own books to sign in an airport bookstore.

In her conversation with Tribune music critic Greg Kot, Dessa dug deeper on what it’s meant for her to select an unconventional career path and stick with it. She dropped her solo album Chime on Doomtree's independent label in February and turned 37 a few months later, an age that’s conventionally seen as ancient by hip-hop standards. A mixture of her own ambition and stubbornness along with a little luck have helped Dessa, but she also acknowledged that the possibility of failure has been a motivating force. "For me, the idea of having wasted my life is a prospect that pushes me back to the lab, or back to the microphone, or back to the writing desk," she said. "I affirm the idea that we’re more sensitive to losses than to gains." —Leor Galil


Jessica Hopper got through her 20s with a lot of help from her friends

Jessica Hopper - DAVID SAMPSON
  • David Sampson
  • Jessica Hopper

Jessica Hopper looked to her personal journals while writing her memoir, Night Moves, and there's one passage in particular that she can't shake: "If I'm not living my most hopeful politics at the ripe old age of 29, then what the hell am I doing?" Hopper says reading that line at age 40 is what steered her back toward writing.

"That line kicked my ass," she told her interlocutor, poet José Olivarez. "What would 29-year-old me think? It made me take an immediate inventory of my life."

Now a 42-year-old suburban mom, Hopper mostly remembers the period covered in her book—2004 to 2008—as years of being broke and living in a gross apartment, trying to make a living by writing concert previews for the Reader and taking DJ gigs for measly amounts of money. But writing the book has right-sized her vision, helping her appreciate what was really happening at that place and time while still not romanticizing it.

The core of the memoir is about how Hopper came to find who she calls her "forever friends" and how they shaped her time in Chicago. She specifically avoided any romantic arc in the book (though her now-husband is mentioned throughout) because there are plenty of books about women who go through torrid love affairs in their 20s. And that's not what was as important to Hopper, anyway.

"For me," Hopper says, "friendship is really the thing that's evolved my thinking and being more than my romance." —Brianna Wellen


There was a real girl behind Nabokov's Lolita—of course there was

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When I first heard about Sarah Weinman's research project—now a book called The Real Lolita, the research for which was the topic of her CHF discussion with Rachel Shteir of DePaul University in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church, I was captivated. There was a real girl behind Vladimir Nabokov’s most renowned fictional creation? Of course there was. A man known as Frank LaSalle—although he had about 20 aliases—kidnapped an 11-year old girl named Sally Horner from her home in Camden, New Jersey in the summer of 1948. (This is mentioned in Nabokov’s text.) If the legacy of #MeToo leaves us with no other lasting lessons, let it leave us with the knowledge that there is always a real crime against a real woman or a girl at the heart of all fiction.

Lolita is the perfect story to consider in this post-#MeToo moment: Weinman says she wanted to "create a portrait of what this 11-year-old girl had gone through," including sexual abuse, repeated rape, and trauma. Because the novel is told by way of unreliable narrator Humbert Humbert, readers aren’t even made aware it was happening.

Of course, the audience was paltry, which gives us further insight into the #MeToo legacy: It'll still be awhile before we learn to give a shit about real things that happen to real women and girls. —Anne Elizabeth Moore

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Eighties rockers the Service birthed venerable Chicago indie label Pravda Records

Posted By on 11.05.18 at 04:56 PM


Since 2004 Plastic Crimewave (aka Steve Krakow) has used the Secret History of Chicago Music to shine a light on worthy artists with Chicago ties who've been forgotten, underrated, or never noticed in the first place. Older strips are archived here.

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Who's that speaking for the Sun-Times this time?

Posted By on 11.05.18 at 06:00 AM

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When this fall the Tribune endorsed Governor Rauner for reelection, it was being true to itself. It's a Republican paper. Over the years, as the Trib endorsed Republicans I had no intention of voting for (and a few I did), I came to understand how it saw its duty: it would make the best case it could make for the GOP candidate for high office—a case usually better than the candidate made for him—or herself—and readers could take it or leave it. 

Readers (and more nonreaders) would mutter Godalmighty! at some of these endorsements. I used to be one of them, but I stopped. The Tribune knew what it was. I did join in the general ridicule two years ago when the Trib—unwilling to endorse Hillary Clinton for president and unable to endorse Donald Trump—put its editorial page behind Gary Johnson, the Libertarian. But that was the Tribune being true to itself in its fashion.

Today we consider the alternative. The editorial page of the Thursday Sun-Times observed that this time around "we endorsed all Democrats in 12 Chicago-area races for Congress. We can't remember the last time we've done that."

Just two years ago, the editorial page went on, "we endorsed [Randy] Hultgren in the 14th District . . . and we might have endorsed [Peter] Roskam in the 6th . . . had he bothered to fill out our questionnaire.

"But things have changed. Roskam and Hultgren have lost their way."

Here's what else has changed. Two years ago the Chicago Federation of Labor wasn't an owner of the newspaper. That era began 16 months ago.

It doesn't really matter what the Sun-Times remembers about its past. It isn't the Sun-Times of 2000, which endorsed George W. Bush for president and, when Al Gore appealed the count in Florida, ran an editorial that began "Desperation does not make a pretty picture" alongside a Mark Steyn op-ed headlined "Following Gore over the cliff: Democratic troops make clear their intention to stick with their fearless leader, no matter how big a fool he makes of himself" and a George Will op-ed headlined "Gore's weak case coming apart at the seams: Democrats' arguments so thin that together they still add up to nothing."

That was the Sun-Times of Conrad Black and David Radler, a Tory and a cynic, neither a friend of labor, and both—beg pardon for the digression—on their way to prison. Nor is today's Sun-Times the Sun-Times of the earlier Rupert Murdoch nor the later Michael Ferro. And it's not the Sun-Times of Marshall Field V, the young Mr. Old Money who benignly presided over the paper's golden age in the 60s and 70s.

When the Sun-Times invokes its history it's not invoking much of anything. 

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Friday, November 2, 2018

What we learned at the Chicago Humanities Festival last night

Posted By on 11.02.18 at 01:42 PM

Abbi Jacobson - EMMANUEL OLUNKWA
  • Emmanuel Olunkwa
  • Abbi Jacobson

Abbi Jacobson, best known as co-creator and co-star of Broad City, did what some people wish they could do after a hard breakup: hit the road to distract herself from her pain. Only she was able to pitch her three-week solo road trip as a book titled I Might Regret This (Essays, Vulnerabilities and Other Stuff). She knows this is bizarre and privileged.


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Thursday, November 1, 2018

Today Andersonville has a record store again

Posted By on 11.01.18 at 04:51 PM

Rattleback Records owner Paul Ruffino in the lounge at the front of the shop - TAYLOR MOORE
  • Taylor Moore
  • Rattleback Records owner Paul Ruffino in the lounge at the front of the shop

After a drought of more than a year, today Andersonville has a record store once again. Sure, you can buy music at Transistor, as well as at several of the resale shops in the area, but Rattleback Records (located at 5405 N. Clark) is the first dedicated record store in the neighborhood since Borderline Music closed its storefront and went online-only in July 2017.

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Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Q&A: Cook County Board candidate Abdelnasser Rashid on taxes, surveillance, and campaign finance reform

Posted By on 10.31.18 at 04:00 PM

COURTESY OF ABDELNASSER RASHID CAMPAIGN
  • Courtesy of Abdelnasser Rashid Campaign

The Cook County Board of Commissioners, which legislates for the second-largest county in the country and oversees a budget poised to hit $6 billion, is one of the rare Republican enclaves in Chicago-area politics. Though the 17-member board is dominated by Democrats, there are four Republicans representing suburban districts. Come next week, though, that number may be down to three.

Abdelnasser Rashid, 29, is a Democratic candidate from the village of Justice, which lies to the southwest of the city between Bridgeview and Willow Springs. Rashid's running to represent Cook County's 17th District against incumbent Sean Morrison of Palos Park. This is actually Morrison's first election too—he was appointed to the seat in 2015, after the resignation of Elizabeth Gorman.

The district, which stretches along the western border of the county from Des Plaines to Orland Park, is home to a growing numbers of Arab-Americans and Muslims. Earlier in the campaign season, polling showed that Rashid, who's backed by a coalition of progressive groups, had a narrow lead over Morrison. The latter came under fire in June when the Sun-Times reported that he was defending his having vouched for a former employee of his security business while the man, Anthony M. Martin, faced charges of soliciting teenage girls for sex. (Martin was allowed to travel despite the charges pending, only to be arrested in Colorado and again charged with using the Internet to solicit an underage girl for sex.)

Rashid, a Harvard graduate who worked on Jesús "Chuy" García's 2015 mayoral campaign and Bernie Sanders's 2016 presidential campaign, also spent two years as deputy chief of staff to Cook County Clerk David Orr. He hopped on a phone call with the Reader this week to discuss what that job taught him about government administration, his views of our broken property tax system, and what might be done to improve public understanding of the role of Cook County in our lives.

What do you say to people who have no idea what a county commissioner is to explain why it's a position worth caring about?

This is a great question, and I get it all the time. Cook County is definitely under the radar. People know they have a member of Congress in D.C., they know they have a state senator and a state rep in Springfield. They often don't know they have a county commissioner or what they do.

There are 17 commissioners who pass ordinances—they pass laws. They're responsible for governing the Cook County health and hospital system, which is a big chunk of the budget. They're responsible for overseeing the criminal justice system—Cook County is an arm of the state when it comes to the administration of justice, so everything from the judiciary, prosecutors, and public defenders to the Cook County Sheriff's Office and the Cook County Jail. The county also oversees property tax administration: the assessor's office, the clerk, the treasurer, the recorder [of deeds], the board of review—the entire property tax system is administered by Cook County. It's a small part of your property tax bill, but Cook County makes sure the system is actually running.

Then, of course, the forest preserve is the responsibility of Cook County commissioners. Even though it's technically a separate unit of government, the commissioners are volunteer commissioners for the forest preserve as well. And there are other items: running elections, Cook County has a huge role to play in economic development and transportation—that's not necessarily a constitutional obligation, but it is something the county needs to do given its size and the needs of the residents. So that's what I tell people.

What's a lesson from working with David Orr, who's one of the most widely respected local politicians, that you'd like to apply to legislating for the county?

I learned so much from David Orr, I absolutely loved working with him. I consider him one of the best public servants that Illinois has had. He's someone who's been able to combine understanding policy and administration. He has a big-picture view of what his office is supposed to be doing for elections, for the property tax system, for ethics and transparency . . . and he also pays attention to the details of the office, makes sure that it's running efficiently, that people are treated well, that customers are getting good service, that the office is accessible, that services are offered in different languages. What I learned from him is how important it is to hire strong, competent folks to the offices we're working in.

The clerk's office directly impacted my choice to run for county commissioner—I got to know Cook County [while working there]. Like a lot of other people, it's not like I knew everything about Cook County growing up. But being in the clerk's office, working on our budget, working with commissioners, seeing everything that the county has done I really began to appreciate and understand its role in our lives. The clerk's office gave me the exposure to Cook County that has allowed me to actually run for this office.

I was a senior official in the clerk's office, and that gave me direct experience managing people, making decisions on policies, working with our labor partners, and basically having to work every single day to provide services to residents. As commissioner, that's going to be critical to me—helping [residents] navigate the property tax system, helping them navigate the criminal justice system.

You've talked a lot about the need to make our property tax system more fair during your campaign and have supported Fritz Kaegi in his bid for the assessor's office. Making the system fair necessarily means rightsizing assessments, and as a result, wealthier property owners who've been systematically underassessed for years will have to pay more in property taxes. How are you preparing to deal with their pushback?

I think it's very simple. Assessments are supposed to be accurate, and you might be upset that your assessment for your downtown skyscraper was suddenly rightsized, as we expect to happen, but that's the right thing to do. I think there certainly will be some people, some of the wealthiest people in Cook County, who will see an increase and they may not be happy, but it's a matter of basic fairness, and I think they'll come to understand that.

The other thing is: accurate assessments and consistently accurate assessments create an environment for investment. Investors don't want to come to the Chicago real estate market when they don't know what to expect from property taxes, as is the case now. So it's actually a deterrent to investment when they don't know what's going to happen, whether one year property taxes are gonna be high, the other year low—they can't predict what profits they're going to make. And so rightsizing might decrease their profits a bit, but they will have predictability, and that creates a more positive business environment. A lot of these folks who are going to be directly impacted by this have been pushing to fix the property tax system themselves, because of what I just mentioned about the business environment. So there's strong support for fixing assessments even for many folks in the real estate business.

You've also talked about the need for progressive revenue streams for county government. The only progressive tax the county can levy is the property tax. But the commissioners froze it in 1994 so it's paying for a smaller and smaller chunk of the county budget over time. Commissioners haven't even wanted to increase the levy by the rate of inflation—which the county's entitled to under the freeze. What's your position on unfreezing the property tax? Or even just taking the inflationary growth?

I think we have to get assessments right first in order to even have a conversation about the property tax freeze. I'm completely against telling some homeowner in Orland Park or in Markham that the county needs more dollars from you when you're already dramatically overassessed. This is gonna take a little bit of time, so I think it's wrong to talk about lifting the property tax freeze when our assessments are so unfair.

OK, but the county has an ongoing structural deficit—there's no hole in next year's budget, but it's going to continue being a problem in the future. Besides property taxes, do you see any other potential progressive sources of revenue that are actually in the county's power to procure?

President Preckwinkle has made clear that the 2019 budget does not include any new tax increases. Moving forward we do need to understand that Cook County is directly impacted by policy-making decisions at the state and federal level. When the state moves toward a graduated income tax, that will help Cook County. If Congress repeals Obamacare or makes changes to the health-care system, that can hurt Cook County and put taxpayers on the hook for more money. But that is all looking toward 2020 and beyond. Right now the 2019 budget will be balanced without any tax increases.

I do think we need to look at how we use the forest preserves. I think we need to do more to attract residents to them, there's opportunity for economic growth. Progressive revenue is certainly an important thing to think about, but it's also important to look at where we can achieve some cost savings that don't hurt workers, like the way we combined the clerk's office with the recorder of deeds office. This saves $2 million in administrative redundancies, and there will be other savings because of streamlining technology. I also support merging the Cook County Clerk's election division with the Chicago Board of Elections for the same reasons. I think those can be one office, they could do the job just fine like other large counties do—that's estimated to save up to $10 million a year, according to the Civic Federation.

What's your position on Countering Violent Extremism, which has been developed as an anti-terrorism program by the federal government (and with which Cook County is involved) but has also been criticized for expanding surveillance of Muslim communities? Are you concerned about it given the history of FBI surveillance of Muslims in Cook County?

I think our federal government needs to understand that they're not going to address national security by profiling Arabs and Muslims. And it's unconstitutional, it's illegal, it's wrong, and it's ineffective. I think too often the CVE programs are a cover for that exact type of community surveillance.

CVE could mean many different things, and I think it's really important that we understand what specifically the county's role is. As commissioner I'd be interested in getting clarity from the Department of Homeland Security in Cook County and other offices as to what projects they're participating in relating to CVE. I will certainly ask questions to make sure that we are not profiling people, and if we are I'll call for us to end participation in these programs.

Is there anything you could do as commissioner to improve voter turnout for these elections?

I think as commissioner the most important thing I can do is to give voters confidence in the work that I do, to be accessible to people, for them to know that I'm transparent about my work and doing my job well and that I'm committed to serving them. I think building public confidence in our elected officials and government is one of the most important things we can do to strengthen our democracy. When everyone's' perception of Cook County is that it's "Crook County," when everyone's perception of Cook County is that it's all about corruption and money going down the drain, people have little incentive to participate in the political process, unfortunately.

There's one more obvious thing: I support small-donor financing. We need to reform our campaign finance system. Until we pass a constitutional amendment or do something to undo the damage from Citizens United, we need to rely on local measures like small-donor campaign financing to incentivize elected officials and candidates to actually seek support from the communities they're trying to represent, rather than seek large amounts of dollars from the politically connected, wealthy corporations, and special interest groups. Our political system right now is inundated with money, and that money drowns out the voices of ordinary people, and we need to do something to curb the influence of money in politics. I could do that specifically as a commissioner by supporting small-donor financing at the county level.

So in essence, creating a county ordinance that would regulate campaign donations for county elections and provide public financing?

Yes, there are existing models, like New York City has small-donor financing. Basically it's an opt-in system where a candidate commits to not accepting any donations above a certain dollar amount. If you commit to that, then any money you receive up to [$175] is matched six to one. So a $50 donation turns into a $300 donation.

And candidates who don't opt in could still take donations in any amount?

Correct. This doesn't completely solve [the problem], but it's one step to allow candidates who don't have access to large amounts of money to still be competitive by raising dollars from their constituents. It doesn't eliminate the ability of big money to still enter the political process, but it does give grassroots candidates more of a chance to compete.

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Beach Bunny’s indie pop goes from dorms to DIY shows to Thalia Hall

Posted By on 10.31.18 at 03:26 PM

Lili Trifilio of Beach Bunny - OWEN LEHMAN
  • Owen Lehman
  • Lili Trifilio of Beach Bunny

Chicago native Lili Trifilio knows that heartbreak and growing up are inevitably painful, but as far as she's concerned, they're pains you can dance your way through. As front woman of indie-pop band Beach Bunny, she turns them into upbeat, danceable tracks you can sway along to. "I hope that when people listen to Beach Bunny and they're going through a hard time, maybe a heartbreak, that they can relate to the lyrics and find some peace in them," she says.

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This definitely isn’t shoo-fly pie on the gig poster of the week

Posted By on 10.31.18 at 06:00 AM

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ARTIST: Phil Guy
SHOWS: Phish at Allstate Arena on Fri 10/26 through Sun 10/28
MORE INFO: someguydesign.com

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Tuesday, October 30, 2018

What we learned at the Chicago Humanities Fest last night

Posted By on 10.30.18 at 01:30 PM

Phoebe Robinson - MINDY TUCKER
  • Mindy Tucker
  • Phoebe Robinson

Phoebe Robinson didn't plan on writing a second book so soon. Her 2016 debut, You Can't Touch My Hair, was a best-seller and a career turning point. Soon after her book took off, HBO turned Two Dope Queens, the podcast she co-hosts with Daily Show alum Jessica Williams, into four specials. She starred in the Netflix film Ibiza and was recently a writer on Portlandia's final season.

She'd arrived. So had Donald Trump.


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Cardi B and Nicki Minaj are feuding—and these women in Chicago rap don’t see the point

Posted By on 10.30.18 at 11:37 AM

Left to right: Akenya, Chimeka, Klevah and T.R.U.T.H. of Mother Nature, Psalm One, and Sisi Dior - PHOTOS BY SAMANTHA FUEHRING, OPTIC BRANCH, NICCI BRIANN, SERENE SUPREME, AND 10 PHOTOS
  • Photos by Samantha Fuehring, Optic Branch, Nicci Briann, Serene Supreme, and 10 Photos
  • Left to right: Akenya, Chimeka, Klevah and T.R.U.T.H. of Mother Nature, Psalm One, and Sisi Dior

On September 7, when Cardi B hurled her red stiletto at Nicki Minaj during a New York Fashion Week party hosted by Harper's Bazaar, years of rumors suggesting a rivalry between the two artists were confirmed. Ever since Cardi broke out with "Bodak Yellow," which became 2017's song of the summer, she seemed immediately confined to the role of challenger to Nicki's throne. The resulting "Cardi or Nicki?" debate implied that only one could reign—not both. Everyone apparently wants to squeeze the two women onto a single pedestal to fight it out. And the fact that they're women definitely matters—this competition is gendered, and if you want proof, ask yourself why nobody's arguing that there's only enough room in rap for one man to be a star.

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