The Bleader | Blog + Reader, the Chicago Reader's blog

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

A lottery will determine whether Kennedy, Biss, or Pritzker's name is first on the gubernatorial primary ballot, and other Chicago news

Posted By on 11.28.17 at 07:00 AM

Illinois senator and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Daniel Biss - AP PHOTO/SETH PERLMAN FILE
  • AP Photo/Seth Perlman file
  • Illinois senator and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Daniel Biss

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Tuesday, November 28, 2017.

  • A lottery will determine whether Kennedy, Biss, or Pritzker's name is first on the primary ballot

Democratic gubernatorial candidates J.B. Pritzker, Chris Kennedy, and Daniel Biss all filed their election paperwork at the earliest possible moment, Monday at 8 AM, in a bid to get the top spot on the March 2018 ballot. Since they all submitted at the same time, the Illinois State Board of Elections will have a lottery to determine whose name gets the coveted spot, according to the Tribune. Incumbent governor Bruce Rauner's name will be first on the GOP primary ballot as his opponent, state representative Jeanne Ives, did not file her paperwork Monday. [Tribune]

  • Cook County Board president Preckwinkle vows to play hardball against challengers

Cook County Board president Toni Preckwinkle filed election paperwork with the Illinois State Board of Elections Monday and vowed to play hardball against challengers, who could include former board president Todd Stroger and former alderman Bob Fioretti, according to the Tribune. "I have a strong record and I'm going to run on it," Preckwinkle said before filing petitions. Stroger and Fioretti have yet to file their paperwork. Preckwinkle is facing a backlash against the now repealed penny-per-ounce sweetened beverage tax. [Tribune]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, November 27, 2017

A John Waters Christmas and more of the best things to do in Chicago this week

Posted By on 11.27.17 at 04:39 PM

John Waters asks goofy questions about Christmas at Thalia Hall on Monday 11/27. - GREG GORMAN
  • Greg Gorman
  • John Waters asks goofy questions about Christmas at Thalia Hall on Monday 11/27.

There's plenty to do in Chicago after the holiday weekend. Here's some of what we recommend:

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Falling enrollments may lead to more Chicago Public Schools closings when the moratorium ends in 2018, and other Chicago news

Posted By on 11.27.17 at 08:39 AM

Parents of students at the Dumas Technology Academy Elementary School protest the school's closing in March 2013. - AP PHOTO/CHARLES REX ARBOGAST
  • AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast
  • Parents of students at the Dumas Technology Academy Elementary School protest the school's closing in March 2013.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Monday, November 27, 2017.

  • When Chicago's school closing moratorium ends in 2018, will Chicago close 50 more schools?

Chicago's moratorium on school closings ends in 2018, and given Chicago Public Schools' "plummeting enrollment" and "more than 100 half-empty school buildings," another wave of school closings is possible, according to WBEZ. Over the last five years, the district has lost 32,000 students, enough to fill 53 CPS schools. The city closed 50 schools in 2013 following a similar drop in enrollment, but it's considered unlikely that Mayor Rahm Emanuel would close that many schools at once again. WBEZ analyzes enrollment patterns and looks at possible school closings. [WBEZ]

  • J.B. Pritzker's plan to rebuild the Illinois Democratic Party

Gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker plans to rebuild the Illinois Democratic Party if he wins the 2018 governor's race, the billionaire businessman told Crain's Chicago Business in an editorial board interview. Illinois Democrats don't meet to endorse candidates, and there's not a unified field organization. "There really is no Illinois Democratic Party," he said. "The Democratic Party doesn't exist. I believe we need to build a real Democratic Party in Illinois when it comes to field." Pritzker also discussed Illinois house speaker Michael Madigan and possible term limits on legislative leadership, pension payments (Pritzker has vowed not to cut them), new revenue (he favors a progressive state income tax), and more with the Crain's editorial board. [Crain's Chicago Business]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, November 24, 2017

Coco is sad in a classically Disney way

Posted By on 11.24.17 at 04:50 PM

Coco
  • Coco

One of the most enduring plot devices of classic Walt Disney animations is the separation of a young hero or heroine from his or her family. Dumbo, Bambi, Pinocchio, and numerous other characters all get estranged from their parents or parental figures, and the anxiety that results from the estrangement motors the stories of the films in which they appear. With this narrative trope, Disney and his storytellers mined a universal childhood fear for maximum emotional impact, and for this reason, the classic Disney features remain powerful experiences decades after they were made.

Coco, a new computer-animated feature from Disney and Pixar, presents a variation on this trope: the young hero separates from his family by choice and wants to return only when he can confront his relatives on his own terms. Mixed with his longing for reunion are the desires for self-determination and compromise—rather than explore an early childhood fear, Coco explores the difficulties of growing up and establishing oneself as an individual.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comedians celebrate the life of the late stand-up Pat Brice a decade after his death

Posted By on 11.24.17 at 12:33 PM

Guaranteed Rate Field projected an image of Pat Brice on a Jumbotron - ASHLEY FLOREZ BRICE
  • Ashley Florez Brice
  • Guaranteed Rate Field projected an image of Pat Brice on a Jumbotron

On a recent Saturday, a crowd of about 400 people, mostly Bridgeport natives, has gathered in a large skybox at White Sox park. The place is dark except for a Jumbotron, which is illuminated with a portrait of the late stand-up comedian Pat Brice. Tonight is a tribute show in honor of Brice's 40th birthday and a fund-raiser for the families of Chicago comics Steve O. Harvey, who lost a bout with cancer in September 2015, and Prescott Tolk, whose father, an Uber driver in New York, was recently killed in an altercation with a man carrying a hockey stick.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thanksgiving weekend in Chicago: Best things to do

Posted By on 11.24.17 at 11:52 AM

The movie Gremlins screens at the Boiler Room on Sunday 11/26. - CREATIVE COMMONS
  • Creative Commons
  • The movie Gremlins screens at the Boiler Room on Sunday 11/26.

If you're wondering how to make the most of your post-Thanksgiving weekend, here's some of what we recommend:

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Appeals court rules in Chicago's favor and against Jeff Sessions in sanctuary city lawsuit, and other news

Posted By on 11.24.17 at 06:00 AM

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks in Washington, D.C. - AP PHOTO/CAROLYN KASTER
  • AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks in Washington, D.C.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Friday, November 24, 2017.

  • Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rules in Chicago's favor in sanctuary city lawsuit

Mayor Rahm Emanuel is thrilled about a ruling in Chicago's favor "in the city's lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's effort to withhold grant money from so-called sanctuary cities," according to the Tribune. The Seventh U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions's motion to "to limit to just Chicago a ruling that blocked the Trump effort nationwide." "Try as they might, the Trump administration cannot bully Chicago into abandoning our values or violating the rights of our residents," the mayor said in a statement. A broader appeal seeking to overturn the injunction is still under way. [Tribune]

  • John Lausch starts working immediately after being sworn in as U.S. attorney

John Lausch was sworn in as the U.S. attorney in Chicago Wednesday, less than two weeks after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate, according to the Tribune. Lausch, who was nominated by President Donald Trump in August, started working immediately after the swearing-in ceremony. Despite being a Trump pick, Lausch is well liked by Democrats and Republicans, including Senators Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth. "With all the partisanship and division in Washington, it's critical that Chicago's U.S. Attorney be a non-partisan professional—I believe Mr. Lausch is the right person for the job," Senator Dick Durbin said in a statement. "Sen. Duckworth and I were glad to work with the White House on Mr. Lausch's nomination and I'm pleased the Senate has confirmed him." [Tribune]

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Watch Hanbun chef David Park turn a spicy, fermented condiment into dessert

Posted By on 11.22.17 at 07:15 PM

Yuzu kosho is a sour, spicy, fermented Japanese condiment made from yuzu zest and juice, salt, and chiles (usually green bird's eye or Thai chiles). It's commonly served with meat or fish—and David Park, chef at Hanbun in Westmont, has used it that way before. But when Joshua Marrelli of Bakersfield W00d-Fired Grill (also in Westmont) challenged him to create a dish with yuzu kosho, he wanted to push himself a little. The most challenging application, he thought, would be dessert.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Is it time to reimagine justice and accountability for sexual misconduct?

Posted By on 11.22.17 at 05:50 PM

Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in Hollywood on November 12. - AP PHOTO/DAMIAN DOVARGANES
  • AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes
  • Participants march against sexual assault and harassment at the #MeToo March in Hollywood on November 12.

Reflecting on the sexual misconduct allegations against Charlie Rose Tuesday morning on CBS, Gayle King voiced some thoughts that may be floating through many people's minds these days: "I'm really struggling because how do you . . . what do you say when someone that you deeply care about has done something that is so horrible?" she asked. "How do you wrap your brain around that? I'm really grappling with that."

Lost in the din of daily public allegations of sexual harassment and assault perpetrated by rich and powerful men is a growing conversation about what happens after the media moves on to something else. What happens to the communities these men are a part of? What becomes of the relationships they're entwined in? What happens to the people they hurt? The most common consequence to the airing of misconduct allegations against most of these men is their immediate exile from their workplaces and, presumably, some of their professional and social networks.

Though many are calling this moment in our culture a "reckoning," there's little substantive discussion in the media about what justice for survivors of harassment and assault—and accountability for the perpetrators—might look like. And not just for the billionaire movie producers and celebrities and politicians, but for the everyday perpetrators of sexual violence: our bosses, colleagues, relatives, friends, and acquaintances. Eighty percent of sexual assaults are perpetrated by people we know, not random strangers; many women have no choice but to live side by side with the men who harass, assault, or rape them. We cannot and will not exile them all. We can't and won't put them all behind bars or sue them into destitution. And we cannot assume that those are the consequences the victims would even want, or that those are the consequences that would put an end to the rape culture permeating our society.

Which is why, perhaps, there's now growing interest in models of addressing interpersonal violence that don't rely on involving the legal system, corporate HR departments, or other formal institutions. Last Monday more than 100 students and community members packed an auditorium at Northwestern University to learn from educator and organizer Mariame Kaba about a method of grappling with sexual and other harm known as "community accountability."

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thanksgiving in Chicago: Best things to do

Posted By on 11.22.17 at 04:59 PM

gallery-1447109043-thanksgiving-movies-index.jpg

Give thanks, stuff yourself, and then venture out for a break from the fam. Here are the Thanksgiving activities we recommend:

Continue reading »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Agenda Teaser

Music
Terry Bozzio Reggie's Rock Club
September 18
Performing Arts
August 26

Tabbed Event Search

The Bleader Archive

Popular Stories