A teenager who disappeared in the 1970s identified as a victim of John Wayne Gacy, and other Chicago news | Bleader

Thursday, July 20, 2017

A teenager who disappeared in the 1970s identified as a victim of John Wayne Gacy, and other Chicago news

Posted By on 07.20.17 at 06:00 AM

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click to enlarge Cook County sheriff Tom Dart  announces the identity of James Byron Haakenson as one of the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy. - AP PHOTO/G-JUN YAM
  • AP Photo/G-Jun Yam
  • Cook County sheriff Tom Dart announces the identity of James Byron Haakenson as one of the victims of serial killer John Wayne Gacy.

Welcome to the Reader's morning briefing for Thursday, July 20, 2017.

  • A teenager who disappeared in the 1970s identified as a victim of John Wayne Gacy

A 16-year-old who left his Minnesota home in 1976 to visit Chicago, James Byron Haakenson, has been identified as a victim of notorious serial killer John Wayne Gacy, the Cook County Sheriff's Department announced Wednesday. The bodies of more than two dozen young men were discovered in Gacy's Chicago-area basement in 1978, and Cook County sheriff Tom Dart ordered eight unidentified bodies to be exhumed in 2011, according to the Tribune. Haakenson is the second of them to be successfully identified. Authorities believe that Haakenson was killed by Gacy shortly after he arrived in Chicago, but it's not clear how they met. "He was a special kid loved by his family," Dart said. "He was not a runaway, but wanted to see the big city. [Tribune] [DNAinfo Chicago]

  • Jason Van Dyke's lawyer is planning to file a change-of-venue motion to move the trial out of Cook County

Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke's legal team would like the first-degree murder trial moved out of Cook County. Van Dyke defense attorney Daniel Hebert is planning to file a change-of-venue motion because he does not think his client will get a fair trial or unbiased jury in Cook County. Van Dyke is facing first-degree murder charges for shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald to death while on duty. [DNAinfo Chicago]


  • Forrest Claypool: It's illegal for Rauner to veto CPS funding

It would be illegal for Governor Bruce Rauner to veto part of a bill that gives Chicago Public Schools more than $300 million from the state, according to CPS CEO Forrest Claypool. Rauner wants to make an amendatory veto to Senate Bill 1, which changes the way Illinois schools are funded, to prevent $300 million going to CPS. "It's not right to give CPS more than its equitable share at the expense of other struggling school districts," Rauner said in a statement. "That's not reform. It is the same old rigged politics that created this disgraceful system we are trying to fix." CPS spokesperson Emily Bittner countered that any such amendatory move "would change a fundamental purpose of the legislation," hence would exceed the power of the governor under the state constitution. Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who's still traveling in Europe, says that schools will open September 5, no matter what Rauner does about funding. [DNAinfo Chicago]

  • Demand for giant warehouses in the suburbs is on the rise

There's an increasing demand for massive warehouse spaces, especially in the far southwest suburbs, according to Crain's Chicago Business. Venture One Real Estate is building a one-million-square-foot warehouse in Channahon without lining up any renters in advance because "logistics firms, retailers and e-commerce companies are on the prowl for big, modern warehouses for storing their goods." [Crain's Chicago Business]

  • University of Chicago acquires nearly 500 new Vivian Maier prints

Nearly 500 Vivian Maier prints, which have never been seen before, have been donated to the University of Chicago Library. Maier was a prolific street photographer who beautifully captured life in Chicago, but her work was not discovered until after her death. "We would like to simply make the collection available to researchers," Daniel Meyer, director of special collections at the library, told the Tribune. "We are very interested in seeing what students and researchers are able to provide in the way of interpretation and analysis." [Tribune]

  • A London-based coffee chain is opening its first U.S. location in Lakeview

A chain of British coffee shops, Department of Coffee and Social Affairs, is opening its first U.S. location at 800 W. Diversey in Lakeview, according to Eater Chicago. The chain now operates 12 shops in the London area after opening its first store in late 2010. [Eater Chicago]


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