Humphrey Bogart's last film for Warners (1951) is a quintessential noir about a crime syndicate specializing in murder. Martin Rackin's script features flashbacks within flashbacks, but it's dated only by his earmarking of contract and hit as obscure underworld slang. When journeyman director Bretaigne Windust took ill a few days into production, Bogart enlisted Raoul Walsh, who turned this into one of his best thrillers but refused to take screen credit as a gesture of friendship toward Windust. The mood of paranoid menace, the suspenseful climax, the beautiful camerawork by Robert Burks, and brassy acting by Ted de Corsia, Zero Mostel, and Everett Sloane make this a giddy classic. 87 min. a Fri 12/8 and Mon 12/11, 6 PM, Gene Siskel Film Center.

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