You searched for:

Search for…

Narrow Search

  • Author

  • Rating

  • Show only

A devastating 1989 documentary feature by Harun Farocki, one of the most interesting and original German independent filmmakers—a mordantly comic montage of short scenes taken from 32 instructional classes, as well as therapy and test sessions. The film alternates between two kinds of activity: simulations and exercises carried out by human beings (learning about everything from child care to striptease to war to sales techniques to auto safety) and products being tested without visible human intervention. The relationships between the two become increasingly disturbing, even chilling: dolls and dummies frequently figure in the simulations in a way that suggests people are being taught to treat other people like objects, while the products being tested are often accorded a kind of care and scrutiny denied to people. The thin line separating socialization from indoctrination is repeatedly traversed—and the implication is that while diverse appliances are being tested for human use, humans are being trained and tested so they can aspire to the performance level of appliances. No offscreen commentary is needed to convey Farocki's eerie message; the brilliant rhymes and contrasts of his montage say everything.

Now Playing

Sorry there are no upcoming showtimes for How to Live in the Federal Republic of Germany

Reviews/comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a review


Roll over stars and click to rate.