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  • Ran (R)

    Akira Kurosawa's 1985 film is slightly marred by some too obvious straining toward masterpiece status, yet it's a stunning achievement in epic cinema. more...
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  • Reality (R)

    Matteo Garrone follows his crime epic Gomorrah (2008) with a comedy about reality TV, and though it hardly rivals the earlier movie in its social complexity, it still offers the spectacle of a vibrant and vividly realized Neapolitan neighborhood. more...
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  • Red Cliff (R)

    Released in China as two movies but edited down to a single feature for U.S. release, John Woo's 2008 historical drama takes place early in the third century, when the Han Dynasty, having won a civil war in the north, set out to crush two troublemaking warlords in the south. more...
  • Repo Man (R)

    Alex Cox's 1984 punk comedy is set in a rotting Los Angeles, where a disaffected adolescent (Emilio Estevez) finds an outlet for his aggression and an answer to his boredom in an apprenticeship with a professional car repossessor (Harry Dean Stanton). more...
  • Restrepo (R)

    Since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, 42 American soldiers have been killed in the desolate Korangal Valley, which serves as a relay point for Taliban forces traveling between Kabul and the Pakistan border. more...
  • The Road (R)

    John Hillcoat, who made a name for himself with the leathery Australian western The Proposition (2005), takes on the daunting task of adapting Cormac McCarthy's bleak novel about a man and his son trying to survive in a postapocalyptic U.S. Portrayed ad infinitum in sci-fi and fantasy, the postapocalypse may now seem about as scary as Post Raisin Bran, but Hillcoat gives it an unnerving solidity by focusing on the drab details of survival and linking them to the more hellish aspects of modern American life. more...
  • Rosemary's Baby (R)

    The treacherous-mate theme that has been a staple of "women's pictures" since Gaslight gets its ultimate, most agonizing development in this 1968 story about a young woman (Mia Farrow) who discovers her husband has sold her body for use by a witches' coven. more...
  • The Royal Tenenbaums (R)

    Wes Anderson's 2001 follow-up to Rushmore is a solid piece of entertainment in the same general mode, though disappointing insofar as it moves the earlier film's stylistic freshness into a kind of formula, increasing the overall cuteness while reducing the sense of adolescent despair. more...