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  • The Gay Divorcee

    Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were first teamed in Flying Down to Rio, but this 1934 feature was their first effort together as stars—and it worked beautifully, with great Cole Porter songs like "Night and Day," and Con Conrad and Herb Magidson's "The Continental." more...
  • Le Grand Amour

    This marvelous French comedy from 1969 kicks off the Gene Siskel Film Center's monthlong retrospective on Pierre Etaix, a professional circus clown whose gag-writing for Jacques Tati's Mon Oncle served as a springboard to his own brief career as a director. more...
  • Goon (R)

    Seann William Scott is the best comic neanderthal in Hollywood (American Pie, Role Models), and he's found the perfect story in this fictionalized adaptation of a memoir by minor-league hockey brawler Doug Smith. more...
  • The Grey (R)

    A great leap forward for the talented action director Joe Carnahan, this old-fashioned suspense tale builds on and yet subtly criticizes the slick violence of his Smokin' Aces (2006) and The A-Team (2010), culminating with a meditation on death that's uncommonly grave for an American movie. more...
  • Gomorrah (NR)

    This Italian crime saga opens with a Godfather-style set piece in which three hoods are assassinated in the gleaming blue light of a tanning salon, which culminates in serial close-ups of their purple-spattered corpses. more...
  • The Godfather, Part II (R)

    Three hours and 20 minutes of Al Pacino suffering openly, Robert Duvall suffering silently, Diane Keaton suffering noisily, and (every so often) Robert De Niro suffering good-naturedly is almost too much, but Francis Ford Coppola pulls it off in grand style. more...
  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (R)

    Sergio Leone's comic, cynical, inexplicably moving epic spaghetti western (1966), in which all human motivation has been reduced to greed—it's just a matter of degree between the Good (Clint Eastwood), the Bad (Lee Van Cleef), and the Ugly (Eli Wallach). more...
  • The Grapes of Wrath (NR)

    John Ford's Oscar-winning 1940 vision of the ant line of Okies marching across the Depression desert to California was based on John Steinbeck's best seller, and it remains, for better or worse, Ford's best-known and most “respectable” film. more...
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