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  • Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne (NR)

    Robert Bresson's ravishing second feature (1945) relocates a self-contained anecdote from Diderot's 18th-century Jacques le Fataliste in a modern setting, with dialogue by Cocteau, about a jealous woman (Maria Casares), ditched by her lover (Paul Bernard), who takes her revenge by tricking the man into marrying a prostitute (Elina Labourdette). more...
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  • Daniel Wong (NR)

    A tall Eurasian man in Chicago's Chinatown is glimpsed by a lonely Asian-American woman (Angela Chan) and a gay man preparing to return to Hong Kong (Isaac Leung); both immediately develop crushes on him, though none of the three ever meet. more...
  • Death in the Terminal (NR)

    This horrifying Israeli documentary reconstructs the 18 minutes of chaos that ensued in October 2015 after a Bedouin gunman attacked a bus station in Beersheba; security forces shot the man dead but also fatally wounded a young Eritrean immigrant they mistook for his accomplice, whom bystanders then kicked and bludgeoned as he lay on the floor bleeding. more...
  • The Devil's Trap (NR)

    A feudal lord in 16th-century Bohemia enlists a priest of the Inquisition to target the son of a troublesome miller, on the pretense that the boy's vast knowledge of nature must be the result of some satanic bargain. more...
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  • Diary of a Chambermaid
  • Diary of a Chambermaid (NR)

    Léa Seydoux stars in this third screen adaptation of Octave Mirbeau's fin de siècle novel, making the title character more cynical than in Jean Renoir's 1946 adaptation and more downtrodden than in Luis Buñuel's 1964 version. more...
  • Dirty Wars (NR)

    The flood of theatrical documentaries about the War on Terror—Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004), Why We Fight (2005), The Ground Truth (2006), No End in Sight (2007), Taxi to the Dark Side (2007), Standard Operating Procedure (2008)—has slowed to a trickle since President Obama took office, which makes this uncompromising exposé from reporter Jeremy Scahill even more important. more...
  • Dog Sweat (NR)

    Like Jia Zhang-ke's Unknown Pleasures and the recent documentary Burma VJ, this Iranian drama was shot on video clandestinely because national review boards would never allow a studio to produce it. more...
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  • Don't Bother to Knock (NR)

    Unusually seedy and small-scale for a Fox picture of 1952, this black-and-white thriller is set over one evening exclusively inside a middle-class urban hotel and the adjoining bar. more...
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  • The Double Hour (NR)

    The neatest thing about Giuseppe Capotondi's debut feature is how it reverses the mechanics of most crime movies: the criminal activity (which includes murder, robbery, and identity forging) is presented coldly and matter-of-factly, while the mundane moments are made to seem tense with possibility. more...
  • Duck Soup (NR)

    The Marx Brothers' best movie (1933) and, not coincidentally, the one with the strongest director—Leo McCarey, who had the flexibility to give the boys their head and the discipline to make some formal sense of it. more...