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  • Bomber (NR)

    Comparisons to Little Miss Sunshine are all but inevitable, but this trenchant and truthful indie comedy masterpiece about a dysfunctional family on a road trip blows that funny little picture out of the water. more...
  • A Borrowed Identity
  • A Borrowed Identity (NR)

    Adapted by Sayed Kashua from his own novel, this coming-of-age story centers on an Arab Israeli accepted into Jerusalem's top private high school in the late 1980s. more...
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  • Botborg! (NR)

    Berlin- and Brisbane-based artists Joe Musgrove and Scott Sinclair perform a synthesis of electronic music and images as part of Conversations at the Edge, the Siskel's ongoing series on media artists. more...
  • The Bottle (NR)

    Alberto Lecchi directed this 2008 comedy about an Argentinian woman who asks a bus driver to transport her urine to Buenos Aires for analysis. more...
  • Boxing Gym (NR)

    Legendary documentary maker Frederick Wiseman follows his epic La Danse—The Paris Opera Ballet (2009) with another record of fancy footwork, this one courtesy of R. Lord's Boxing Gym in Austin, Texas. more...
  • Boy & the World
  • Boy & the World (NR)

    An Oscar nominee for best animated feature, this magical Brazilian fantasy by Alê Abreu reminded me of Nina Paley's Sita Sings the Blues (2008) and Tomm Moore's The Secret of Kells (2009) in its crafty combination of simply drawn characters (the boy) and ornate geometrical patterns (the world). more...
  • The Boy Mir (NR)

    Phil Grabsky revisits the Afghan boy at the center of his 2004 documentary The Boy Who Plays on the Buddhas of Bamiyan, tracking his progress from age 8 to 18. more...
  • The Breach (NR)

    Fishing guide Mark Titus sets out to discover the reason behind the recent plummet in salmon populations. more...
  • Breakfast at Tiffany's (NR)

    Blake Edwards's 1961 film of Truman Capote's novel is one of his best-known efforts but far from his best—it's one of the few that he didn't write, and screenwriter George Axelrod has entirely too many opportunities to indulge his own rather sleazy sense of social satire. more...