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  • The Artist (PG-13)

    French director Michel Hazanavicius takes a break from his OSS 117 spy spoofs to pay loving tribute to the silent cinema, re-creating its luminous black-and-white photography and consigning all the dialogue to intertitles. more...
  • Battling Butler

    The weakest, most conventional of Buster Keaton's silent features, and—it almost goes without saying—the most commercially successful by far (1926). more...
  • Beyond the Rocks

    Long considered lost, this 1922 silent melodrama was recovered from a private collection in 2003 and restored by the Nederlands Filmmuseum, which has added English intertitles, a new score, and an introduction by Martin Scorsese. more...
  • Body and Soul

    One of the revelations of this 1925 feature by pioneer black filmmaker Oscar Micheaux is that, in contrast to the faltering technique and garbled film syntax of his sound pictures, he was stylistically assured as a silent director. more...
  • Camille

    Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino star in this 1921 silent feature based on the Alexander Dumas novel. more...
  • The Cat and the Canary

    This hoary stage thriller had already become camp by the time it was filmed in 1927, and director Paul Leni (a German expatriate) treats its masked killers, secret passageways, and sliding panels with tongue bulging in cheek. more...
  • The Chalice of Sorrow (NR)

    Rex Ingram, regarded as one of the most brilliant directors of the silent era, first made his mark in Hollywood with this 1916 melodrama about an opera singer in Mexico City, the artist she wants to save from execution, and the corrupt politician who hopes to exploit the situation. more...
  • Chicago

    Maureen Watkins's 1926 play about a flamboyant vamp trying to beat a murder rap has enjoyed a long shelf life: it was filmed as Roxie Hart in 1943 and adapted into a stage musical by Bob Fosse in 1975 before Rob Marshall's 2002 film of the Fosse show won six Oscars. more...
  • City Girl

    F.W. Murnau designed his last Hollywood film (1929) as a sweeping pastoral symphony—the story of wheat, from field to table, to be entitled Our Daily Bread. more...