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  • Phantom of the Opera (NR)

    Critics rank this 1925 feature by Rupert Julian well below Nosferatu and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, but Lon Chaney's performance as the hideous organist prowling the sewers beneath the Paris Opera is still a cornerstone of gothic horror. more...
  • We Are the Night (NR)

    Three lesbian vampires inhabiting a hyperstylized Berlin initiate a feisty new recruit who's ambivalent about the idea of killing to survive. more...
  • Stake Land (NR)

    An orphaned teenager (Connor Paolo) and a lone hunter (Nick Damici, who cowrote the script) search for safety in a postapocalyptic Rust Belt, defending themselves against vampires and white militia outfits. more...
  • Kuroneko (NR)

    Samurai soldiers rape and murder a woman and her daughter-in-law living alone in a house near the forest, but a black cat licking at their abandoned bodies spells trouble for the perpetrators: years later, as the same men happen one by one through the forest, each is seduced by two ghostly women and led to his doom. more...
  • Repulsion (NR)

    Roman Polanski's first film in English (1965) is still his scariest and most disturbing—not only for its evocations of sexual panic, but also because his masterful employment of sound puts the audience's imagination to work in numerous ways. more...
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  • Eyes Without a Face (NR)

    As Dave Kehr originally described it, “a classic example of the poetry of terror.” Georges Franju's 1959 horror film, based on a novel by Jean Redon, is about a plastic surgeon who's responsible for the car accident that leaves his daughter disfigured; he attempts to rebuild her face with transplants from attractive young women he kidnaps with the aid of his assistant. more...
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  • Peeping Tom (NR)

    Michael Powell's suppressed masterpiece, made in 1960 but sparsely shown in the U.S. with its ferocity and compassion intact. more...
  • The Magician (NR)

    Known in Sweden as The Face, Ingmar Bergman's 1958 film operates on the principle that illusion and reality, the darkly irrational and mysterious and the brightly rational and obvious, both possess an enormous power over the soul and mind of man. Set in the 19th century, it's one of Bergman's most tightly structured and frightening films. more...