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  • After Hours

    Martin Scorsese transforms a debilitating convention of 80s comedy—absurd underreaction to increasingly bizarre and threatening situations—into a rich, wincingly funny metaphysical farce. more...
  • Alan Partridge
  • Alan Partridge (R)

    Steve Coogan brings his most popular character—the vain, tactless broadcaster Alan Partridge—to the big screen after more than two decades of playing him in British radio and television. more...
  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

    Like most of his work, Stanley Kubrick's deadly black satirical comedy-thriller on cold war madness and its possible effects (1964) has aged well: the manic, cartoonish performances of George C. Scott, Sterling Hayden, and Peter Sellers (in three separate roles, including the title part) look as brilliant as ever, and Kubrick's icy contempt for 20th-century humanity may find its purest expression in the figure of Strangelove himself, a savage extrapolation of a then-obscure Henry Kissinger conflated with Wernher von Braun and Dr. Mabuse to suggest a flawed, spastic machine with Nazi reflexes that ultimately turns on itself. more...
  • Domestic

    This assured black comedy by Adrian Sitaru modifies the epic formalism of the Romanian new wave, with its geometrical frames and endlessly long takes, into something more digestible than recent endurance tests like Cristi Puiu's Aurora (2010). more...
  • 50/50 (R)

    Young people battling cancer aren't exactly a staple of movie comedy, but this nervy project from director Jonathan Levine (The Wackness) mines a remarkable number of laughs from the situation. more...
  • Generation P (NR)

    In this loopy, phantasmagoric satire, a failed poet enters the burgeoning advertising industry in early-90s Russia, works his way up the corporate ladder, and eventually gets recruited by a shadow organization that controls the government. more...