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  • Thieves Like Us (R)

    Robert Altman's good-natured reluctance to be moved by the most common forms of sentiment yields, in this 1974 remake of Nicholas Ray's They Live by Night, a cool, at times unbearably objective look at the fragile relationship between two rather ordinary young people in Depression America (Keith Carradine and Shelley Duvall), who happen to rob banks and get shot at a lot. more...
  • Trance (R)

    Danny Boyle's twisty noir thriller (adapted from a 2001 TV movie of the same name) begins with the sort of ludicrous premise that Fritz Lang or Otto Preminger might have tackled in the late 1940s. more...
  • The Thomas Crown Affair (R)

    It's no doubt dated now, but this heist movie starring Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway was considered pretty hot stuff back in 1968. more...
  • Texas Killing Fields (R)

    In this southern-fried rehash of David Fincher's Seven (1995), two mismatched police detectives track a fiendish serial killer around the bayou as he taunts and toys with them. more...
  • The Town (R)

    Ben Affleck's feature directing debut, Gone Baby Gone (2007), achieved a tragic depth unusual for a crime film because the child at its center, though rescued from kidnappers, was ultimately deposited back into a hopeless cycle of poverty and domestic abuse. more...
  • The Taking of Pelham 123 (R)

    Superior exercise in urban paranoia (1974); the superb location work of director Joseph Sargent goes a long way toward tempering the artificialities of the plot, which concerns an attempt to hold a subway train for ransom. more...
  • True Romance (R)

    Tony Scott (Top Gun) directs a Quentin Tarantino script about a couple (Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette) fleeing from Detroit to Los Angeles with the mob and the police after them (1993). more...
  • Thief (R)

    The 1981 feature debut of Michael Mann is firmly aligned along the neo-macho axis of Scorsese, Cimino, and Schrader; it's an attempt to parlay a surly, alienated hero (James Caan) into an abstract existential force. more...